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Discussion Starter · #101 ·
silent - basic load is 210 rounds. Units and individuals can and very often do plus that up but doctrinally basic load = 210 rounds.

Steve - Not sure about the ODAs but it is issued in Reg't.
 

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Soldier
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Steve - We're starting to get the magnifiers in as well, however they aren't that model, the grooved pattern carved into the plastic is an older model, and is quite often the model that is bootlegged by the HK airsoft companies. The model we're getting in is similar to the one you saw at my house last visit.
 

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Are knee pads a requirement for Soldiers? I've seen them being used on almost every soldier.
All depends on the chain of command and possibly mission requirements. Personally, mine were left in a duffel bag the entire deployment. But I also wasn't going on raid missions or anything of that nature. The majority of our missions were in the 4 days to 2 weeks time frame so what ever was non-essential was dumped.

I did see other units wearing knee pads, but I couldn't tell you more than that.
 

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Rod, as stated above the headset is a Bose intra-vehicular headset. and back in 08-09 the surefire was issued to my unit in Samarra while we were with the 101st.

Matthew2388, Once again while I was in Iraq during 08-09 Knee pads and elbow pads were a RIF issue to every soldier. The 101st Bde commander at the time of my Iraq vacation made it a requirement that all soldiers would wear knee pads at all times while outside the wire. Even the gunners and drivers of the vehicles regardless if they would ever leave said vehicle during any given operation. Guess the man thought they were body armor or something. LOL
 

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Whatever Works, Dude
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The My Little Pony post reminded me that I've had a mess of questions about patches and patch placement. From what I've been able to figure out:

- Right arm is supposed to have the flag and (optionally) a unit patch if you've done a combat deploy with that unit. Recently, I've also seen combat shirts which have flag, rank insignia, and nametape. Is that a field vs. garrison thing, or are there rules about that?

- Do you wear tabs on the right-arm unit patch, like the "Airborne" tab if you did a combat deploy with the 101st?

- I also remember reading from major.rod that the Rangers don't wear any prior unit patch on the right arm -- did I remember that right?

- Left arm is supposed to have current specialist tabs and current unit patch, I think.

- If you're a super stud muffin and have more than 3 specialist tabs to your name, can you wear them all on the left sleeve? I think you'll run out of room even if you wanted to, but I've never been clear on how those worked.

- As far as I can tell, the standard blouse has nametape on the right, "U.S. Army" on the left, and the rank insignia on the centerline.

- I've not seen many patches on body armor in conventional units -- are there regs on that, or is that a unit-to-unit thing?

- Sometimes, I've seen the right-arm flag patch (with the star field in the upper-right corner) worn on chests or the left-side. The rule I learned way back in the Boy Scouts was to display the flag so that the star field was always in the upper-left corner, but the Army puts the flag field on the upper-right so it would look like it was always advancing. Is there a story here?

- When did the Army start doing that "backwards" flag thing, anyway? And do other branches of the military use it, or do they just use those flag patches when they're working with Army units and want to blend in?

- Is there a standard place people put those blood type patches that are relatively common in the 1/6 world? Or are those not really used?

Thanks in advance for indulging the civilian!
 

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- When did the Army start doing that "backwards" flag thing, anyway? And do other branches of the military use it, or do they just use those flag patches when they're working with Army units and want to blend in?
These were also worn during Operations Desert Shield / Desert Storm. It's not a "backward" flag, it's a flag that looks like it's moving forward, like during a charge.



Note that law enforcements agencies that have a US flag on their uniforms, the opposite is true... the field of stars is to the rear.

From Army Regulation 670-1

28-18. Wear of full-color U.S. flag cloth replica

a. General. All soldiers throughout the Force, regardless of deployment status, will wear the full-color U.S. flag cloth replica on utility and organizational uniforms.

b. Description. The colors of the U.S. flag cloth replica are red, white, and blue. The size is approximately 2 inches by 3 inches.

c. How worn.

(1) When approved for wear, the full-color U.S. flag cloth replica is sewn ½ inch below the right shoulder seam of the temperate, hot-weather, enhanced hot-weather, and desert BDU; the BDU field jacket; and the cold-weather uniform (see fig 28-135). If the SSI-FWTS is worn on the right shoulder of the utility uniform, the full-color U.S. flag cloth replica is placed ?; inch below the right shoulder sleeve insignia (see fig 28-136). The SSI-FWTS is not authorized for wear on organizational uniforms, unless indicated above.

(2) The full-color U.S. flag cloth replica is worn so that the star field faces forward, or to the flag's own right. When worn in this manner, the flag is facing to the observer's right, and gives the effect of the flag flying in the breeze as the wearer moves forward. The appropriate replica for the right shoulder sleeve is identified as the reverse side flag.

:clap
 

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Discussion Starter · #109 ·
Ed

Flag – Like Russ said for the one on the soldier’s right sleeve. On the chest blue field should be to left but there’s no PX in Afghanistan. You use what you have. First time I was issued a flag was during desert storm. It started again shortly after 911.

Airborne tabs are almost always part of the division patch (95%). So it gets worn on the combat patch side with the patch. E.g. the screaming eagle is NEVER worn without an airborne tab.

Soldier can wear a max of three skill tabs on the left shoulder (never on the right). It's called the "tower of power". Airborne tab is not considered a skill tab.

Combat patch is worn on the right side except for the combat shirt. Since it only has room for one patch the unit patch is worn on the right shoulder. Dumb, they should have put the Velcro on the left side but they didn’t. Some after market shirts have enough Velcro. Not common. Rank is only worn on the sleeve of the combat shirts (R side) for the same reason as the backwards unit patch, Velcro placement

Rank is typically worn on the front of the body armor if it happens to have the Velcro for it. Pretty common with IBA and Gen I IOTV. Sometimes the vest doesn’t have the Velcro and/or unit determines where the patch is sewn. This gets very confusing downrange where the soldier does the sewing (again no px). Names seem to be going away on the vests. Again no Velcro and units seem to be busy with other things.

Rangers aren’t wearing unit patches. Flag (and leader callsign if they rate one on L shoulder and sometimes chest and/or helmet)
 

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Discussion Starter · #112 ·
CC - In conventional units troops don't wear call signs. If anything they wear rank and depending on the unit/op some leaders MIGHT may wear identifying kit (e.g. strobe, chemlight).

I think I'll leave ODA callsigns commenting to some of our operators. Their use varies by unit and position.

To add what I told silent, it's SL and above and special duty positions and enablers.

Specific callsigns are considered an OSPEC issue by SF and Ranger units. I know they are seen in many photos but they are either not cleared or mistakenly posted.
 

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Whatever Works, Dude
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Thanks for the detailed answers, guys!

These were also worn during Operations Desert Shield / Desert Storm. It's not a "backward" flag, it's a flag that looks like it's moving forward, like during a charge.
Oh, I know why the Army uses it. It's just that I was used to the rule I learned in the Boy Scouts I mentioned in my post, so when I first started seeing the flag that way on Army uniforms, I asked, "why is the flag backwards?" Google set me straight pretty quick :).
 

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This is a great thread, but it really breaks my spirit. As someone who just cannot stand to bash anything that is not accurate, I am just frustrated knowing my current grunt project is screwed.

Oh well... it is what it is.

Thanks guys for great information that would have taken me a while to research on my own.

:thumb
 

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Discussion Starter · #115 ·
JT - Not necessarily. You can concievably put something together with parts from various sets that are out. Tough but possible.

Glad you found the thread helpful.
 

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This is a great thread, but it really breaks my spirit. As someone who just cannot stand to bash anything that is not accurate, I am just frustrated knowing my current grunt project is screwed.

Oh well... it is what it is.

Thanks guys for great information that would have taken me a while to research on my own.

:thumb
Brother, I need to echo Will's statement here. Dont let this thread deter you from doing your original bash. A LOT of the gear I had and worn wasn't issued. One of these days, I'll have to find some of my pics and post them to give some better examples. It really all depends on the chain of command for the grunts that is the deciding factor for equipment that can be worn.
 

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Brother, I need to echo Will's statement here. Dont let this thread deter you from doing your original bash. A LOT of the gear I had and worn wasn't issued. One of these days, I'll have to find some of my pics and post them to give some better examples. It really all depends on the chain of command for the grunts that is the deciding factor for equipment that can be worn.
Thanks! And thanks for all your input here and sharing your experience. It means a lot to those of us so-called "thread count Nazis" who sometimes let their quest for accuracy get in the way of enjoying the hobby to its fullest.

And thanks to you, too, Will. I know you get inundated with questions about this and that and you always are very gracious to help when I call on you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #118 ·
Glad I could help JT.

Don't give up. You know I have seen the most screwed up combinations of camo and equipment not on figures but on actual troops. The reality that vvv was alluding to is you fight with what you got even if it looks like crap. Sometimes the item just doesn't exist and you have to improvise.

I've always tried to be helpful to folks that want to be "accurate". That annoys some folks that aren't as focused on accuracy or my input contradicts their beliefs. It's a big hobby. There's room for everyone. Feel free to ask questions and do your research. That's how we all learn and grow.
 

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What is this rifle (upper)? Is this something new the Army is testing?



U.S. Army National Guard Sgt. 1st Class Michael Nelson, platoon sergeant, and 1st Lt. Brandon Bowden, platoon leader of the security force element of Provincial Reconstruction Team Farah, pull security during a road assessment mission in Farah province, Afghanistan, May 9. SECFOR is made up of National Guard infantrymen out of Alaska who are responsible for ensuring the safety of everyone assigned to FOB Farah. PRT Farah is a unit of soldiers, sailors and airmen working with various government and non-government agencies tasked with facilitating governance and stability in the region by working hand in hand with local officials and the government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. The goal of the PRT is to promote the Afghan government and their ability to resolve local issues and provide security to the people. The government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and PRT are dedicated to finding long term, sustainable solutions to the instability in the region and shift the population's dependence from foreign aid to the local and national government. Staff Sgt. Jonathan Lovelady

Found on militaryphotos.net and I'm just amazed it would ever be allowed that someone could use they're privately purchased upper.
That looks like a PWS piston upper. Probably personal purchase...I see alot of Army guys taking their own uppers to the battlefield. We could never do that in the Marines :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #120 ·
e-man You've seen a lot of personally owned uppers? I guess "a lot" is a bit subjective. How many have you seen? My feedback is that taking one's upper is pretty rare. IF one has a command that will buy off on it most soldeirs aren't spending $600 -$1000on their personal upper which might actually get confiscated or disallowed . I'm sensing privately owned uppers is exceedingly rare. Have you personally experienced something different. I'm curious! Share if you can?
 
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