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Very nice work!
The way he carries the rifle adds a lot to the realism of the pose.
 

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Loser 6
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Beautifully done! Very natural in pose and look. You have given us an excellent portrayal for this time period. It is always a treat to see your work......Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks a lot everyone - I really appreciate the feedback! I had in mind this regular landser with regular gear, just one soldier in an army of many others, I did however give him that moustasche to get the impression that he's a soldier that "stands out from the crowd". The HS, by the way, is one of my favorite ones'; DML's Vaprossov.
 

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wave man TDY staff
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He's off to find out what so many soldiers before him learned, as will likely his son. It's so great to see WW1 getting done, and how good DML sculpts look, with a bit of effort. Fine landser, glenning.
 

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Hallo!

It is a sub zero night, so I might as well add a wee bit of WWI German trivia for anyone interested...

In brief...

The white "sabre knot" cord and tassel tied to the bayonet scabbard of this figure was part of the distinctive "ID" of a German infantryman (part of (twelve 12 companies of 240 men) identified by their "sabre knot/tassels" (Troddeln), AND by the company number on their shoulder board buttons.

A 13th and 14th company were added for the new heavy machine companies, followed by a 15th and 16th company late in 1914, and a heavy MG company. (Which broke down almost immediately due to volume and supply problems). In the Fall of 1915, the shoulder board buttons with company numbers were dropped from the field jacket and coat, saving them for the "peacetime" uniform.

In March of 1916, due to the blockade, shortages of cotton saw the tassels made out of recycled old cotton. Since "camo" became more important, the ribbon and fringe were alsomade of gray instead of white, keeping just the colored parts the same.

In January 1917, the effects of the blockade got worse local materials scarce, and production of tassels was completely stopped. Existing supplies in inventory lasted a couple of months until all were gone.

Anyways, each infantry regiment in the German Army consisted of three battalions and each battalion had four companies. Enlisted soldiers wore the M1873 Troddel, and depending on what color combinations were used indicated the battalion and company.
There were four colors used:

white for 1st
red for 2nd
yellow for 3rd
blue for 4th





A little paint can give early War and mid War infantry a bit more variety other than all being in the 1st Battalion, 1st Company.

I did not label the troddel image. Band, Schieber, Stengel, Kranz, and Quaste is also Band, Schieber, Eichel, Kranz, and Fransen. IMHO, a matter if one says tassels or fringe. :)
There! I feel warmer.

:)
 

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While on the subject cord and tassel: Was this really worn all the time by the early/mid-war German soldiers? Since it is is how it is, I could imagine it getting stuck in things you don't want to get stuck in like barbed wire and also generally being a large item not necessary for survival with?

(But apart from that, that's some really good info right there, Kurt-Heinrich)

(BTW, something related: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...-price-captured-camera-one-brothers-arms.html )
 
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