One Sixth Warriors Forum banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
While it is a nice "lesson," I personally wouldn't bother with those kinds of games because they'd actually be within their rights for a refund. It's unnecessary trouble.
 

·
Resisting Evil
Joined
·
5,730 Posts
And yet we want to buy boxed figures for dirt cheap, and don't care that it took people to make the parts and put it all together and package it.......does not just apply to custom stuff.......
 

·
Riverboat engineman
Joined
·
2,219 Posts
No refund.
The buyer just stated that the wire wrap bracelet he made were too high priced.
The buyer then quoted the price of materials and a tool only.
Nothing was mentioned about making one, only you would get your GOODS in the mail.
But beyond that ,you go to a customizer because you can not do the work.
If you can not see the effort put into a custom piece and the cost associated with it, stick to a regular boxed or plain piece.
 

·
Speed Thrills
Joined
·
3,997 Posts
Poignant and true. You only have to try and do it yourself one time before you realize why a custom cost as some do. I recently received some custom Uniforms (6) so I began to reverse engineer a pair of the Pants :dizzy If it took them half the time to construct them as it took me to deconstruction them I got an excellent deal on the uniforms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
No refund.
The buyer just stated that the wire wrap bracelet he made were too high priced.
The buyer then quoted the price of materials and a tool only.
Nothing was mentioned about making one, only you would get your GOODS in the mail.
Still, that's disingenuous and unprofessional. The buyer approached the artisan for a bracelet from the beginning, not raw material. At no time was the buyer informed (according to what was posted) that they would only be receiving raw materials. No money or goods should have been exchanged - that deal was dead in the water at that point. If the artisan has enough common sense not to take a loss on that deal, then he or she has enough common sense to cease dealings with a noncompliant customer.

In my other hobbies, if a knife/sheath maker or custom gun grip/holster maker pulled that stunt, they'd be in deep water if they had led the customer to believe that they'd receive a finished product. The right (and efficient) course of action would be to simply ignore further haggling requests instead of playing tricks.

Anyhow, while it is a decent lesson, something about that original posting reads a lot like a chain letter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,174 Posts
Do people still believe in stories like this?

As to the original intent of the post: I don't really question how a merchant put a price on their stuff. It will just irritate them. In that story (whether it's true or not, which I believe is not) the merchant went too far just to illustrate how she feels. There is no win-win scenario here. I can haggle, but to question how a person does his business is a no-no for me.

Suffice it to say the issue of price / affordability can be a really sticky issue when dealing one-on-one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
Human knowledge, skill and talent are regularly undervalued. I studied German and get asked to do a translation now and then, but rarely do it because the discussion goes like this:

"Can you translate this <insert highly technical text, usually construction or mechanical engineering> for me?"

"Sure, but it will cost you X"

"X is way overpriced"

"No, because, in addition to regular vocabulary and grammar I spent almost 15 years perfecting, I have to LEARN the tech jargon I don't even understand in my mother tongue as I am not a mechanical engineer"

"Meh, you want to charge X for something AS SIMPLE as translating"

"On second thought. I'm too busy. Since translating is that simple, you do it. I'll lend you my grammar books if that will help you do it faster."
 

·
volunteercontentprovider
Joined
·
2,824 Posts
Still, that's disingenuous and unprofessional. The buyer approached the artisan for a bracelet from the beginning, not raw material. At no time was the buyer informed (according to what was posted) that they would only be receiving raw materials. No money or goods should have been exchanged - that deal was dead in the water at that point. If the artisan has enough common sense not to take a loss on that deal, then he or she has enough common sense to cease dealings with a noncompliant customer.

In my other hobbies, if a knife/sheath maker or custom gun grip/holster maker pulled that stunt, they'd be in deep water if they had led the customer to believe that they'd receive a finished product. The right (and efficient) course of action would be to simply ignore further haggling requests instead of playing tricks.

Anyhow, while it is a decent lesson, something about that original posting reads a lot like a chain letter.
It's a parable, not a news item.
 

·
One Sixth Junkie
Joined
·
6,321 Posts
Human knowledge, skill and talent are regularly undervalued. I studied German and get asked to do a translation now and then, but rarely do it because the discussion goes like this:

"Can you translate this <insert highly technical text, usually construction or mechanical engineering> for me?"

"Sure, but it will cost you X"

"X is way overpriced"

"No, because, in addition to regular vocabulary and grammar I spent almost 15 years perfecting, I have to LEARN the tech jargon I don't even understand in my mother tongue as I am not a mechanical engineer"

"Meh, you want to charge X for something AS SIMPLE as translating"

"On second thought. I'm too busy. Since translating is that simple, you do it. I'll lend you my grammar books if that will help you do it faster."
:rolling
 

·
1:6 Acquisitionist
Joined
·
12,934 Posts
The art of negotiation/negotiating have nuances & subtleties.

If the price appears to be too high for a buyer, the buyer can politely inquire if the price is negotiable.

If the price is absolutely, positively, & undeniably non-negotiable for whatever reason for the seller, the seller can post a sign indicating as such or politely informing a potential buyer that the price is marked as such and non-negotiable.

I've experienced & witnessed both ends of the spectrum and in-between over the years of collecting and 1:1 business dealings; however, sometime common & simple courtesy/politeness with common sense form both sides may yield mutually satisfying results.

Of course, the one common & obvious adage is simply, "Don't be a cheap @ $ $ and/or greedy @ $ $ hole and be <CENSORED>ing reasonable." This applies to both parties as well. Of course, it's easier said than done.
 

·
Guardian of Hades
Joined
·
1,558 Posts
:sadshake It sounds like a fish story to me.

While I agree with the message, the story itself sounds bogus.
It's a cute story but only the :whee gulible would believe it actually happened in real life.
 

·
costoMISER
Joined
·
9,480 Posts
Human knowledge, skill and talent are regularly undervalued. I studied German and get asked to do a translation now and then, but rarely do it because the discussion goes like this:

"Can you translate this <insert highly technical text, usually construction or mechanical engineering> for me?"

"Sure, but it will cost you X"

"X is way overpriced"

"No, because, in addition to regular vocabulary and grammar I spent almost 15 years perfecting, I have to LEARN the tech jargon I don't even understand in my mother tongue as I am not a mechanical engineer"

"Meh, you want to charge X for something AS SIMPLE as translating"

"On second thought. I'm too busy. Since translating is that simple, you do it. I'll lend you my grammar books if that will help you do it faster."
 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 35 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top