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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

Here are 2 pics of my current work in progress about a Western custom figure of Seth Bullock, from Deadwood. I'd like this figure to be personnal and so, inspired from both the TV series (Deadwood) and the real Seth Bullock who really existed.

Sorry for the bad quality of the photos, I quickly took them with my cell phone.





By the way here are pics of Seth Bullock in Deadwood TV series :







And here's a pic of the real Seth Bullock :



As i said I don't want to make a figure close to the series or the real character but my own Seth Bullock in way, inspired by both. It's still a WIP, and a long way untill it is finished, but i just wanted to show you how it is going as a start!...

Thanks for viewing ;)

PS : thanks for the help I received when I asked in a previous thread about 1/6 Western clothes, it really helped out, thanks guys!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for your comments gentlemen, glad you like it - even if it is just a draft at the moment!

By the way, I've got a question about the revolver that he holds on the HBO pic : what revolver is it? The one I've got with the rig from Stevos Toys (excellent product by the way, it looks so nice!) is a 1873 Colt Peacemaker. It is fine to me but Stevos has also a large range of guns available, and if I can find the right one it would be better. Thanks for your help in advance! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the info! I'll see if I can find one at 1/6 scale. Stevos provides a nice bunch of Old West 1/6 revolvers in metal. I saw a Remington close to this one in his catalog but it's a 1858 model, ball and cap. So it wouldn't match with weapons used in the late 1870's I think. If I can't find the 1875 model, I'll keep the Colt - it won't be a big deal cuz I will leave it in the holster most of the time anyway.
 

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SuperPask, theres a good chance cap & ball would still have been used in the 1870's. There was a large amount that made their way west after the war and their owners would have hung on to them, replacing them when they had to rather than replace them just because self contained cartridge revolvers became available. Most of the early production Colt SAA's went to military contract I believe, so wouldn't have been widely available on the civilian market till some time later. According to some sources, some people actually prefered cap & ball over cartridge due to the easier availability of loose powder. When Wild Bill himself was killed in 1876, the belt pistols he was said to be carrying was either Colt Navies or Armies (depending on the source), not cartridge pistols. Hope this is some help to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well thanks for all these details! I'm new to old revolvers and weapons of that era. I take note of what you said. I thought cartridge revolvers might have been more used very quickly as soon as they were available because they looked easier to use than ball & cap guns. I had the chance to see real ball & cap and also cartridge revolvers and rifles of that time (replicas and a genuine Winchester) recently. Indeed I moved to another base in September, and talking about my 1/6 hobby I came across a workmate who collects that kind of weapons and even shoots with ball & cap revolvers (1860 Navy and 1851 Army Colts). He showed them to me and also explained how to load ammmo. So I just thought that it would take sometime to set a six gun ready to fight and that when cartridges guns were created, they would have been prefered by most of people.

But what you say about the powder is a very interesting detail that should indeed explain why ball & cap guns would still have been used. So, on my side I'll keep searching info. And if for example I find somewhere that the real Seth Bullock used a ball & cap revolver, I will look forward to change the gear of my figure (the present rig has cartidges on it). Anyway, I take my time to find all info and the right loose gear and I'll make my bash slowly little by little! ;)
 

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As far as I can tell by blowing up the pic of the actor, it looks like he's got a New Model Army Remington with a factory conversion with ejector (they were converted with and without).

It's the same pistol as the '58 Remington (patent date) cap-and-ball, converted to cartridge. Not a percussion/cap-and-ball pistol in the pic.

Truth be known, Colt pretty much copied Remington with their "Peacemaker" design. Colts started off using an open-top frame design. One of Remington's selling points was the fact that they used a top-strap on the frame which resulted in a much stronger and accurate pistol. The one pictured in the thread here by Tommo has a fluted cylinder, not present on these models.

All you need to do is get a Remington and add the ejector if it doesn't already have one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Wow! You've got an eagle eye! :D How come you can see all these details on the pic!? Thank you very much for this information. If it is indeed a converted 1858 Remington, I'll try to find one for my figure or at least I'll take the one made by Stevos that I may modify. For the moment I keep looking over the internet, trying to find further more infor about this kind of revolvers. I've found out many interesting sites (weaon dealers, collectors, historic sites etc) so far. But the ideal thing would be to find a page giving details about the different parts of such revolvers, showing pics etc. A bit like what we got in the military in weapon manuals : you always have a section detail all the parts, how to remove / install them etc. Due to my job, the only guns I know well are the FAMAS 5.56, the PA MAC50 and good old PM MAT49. So, oldies like these revolver are in the same time new to me but part names always ring the bell. To my mind, it's very interesting to know many details about how those old weapons worked, and it would certainly add a little more authentic touch to my figure, even it would be personnal version of the real character.
 

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Pascal,

All I did was blow up the image. It lost some detail in doing so, but alot of elements can still be made out. Judging shadows and taking into acount the angle of the photo, I used a little background on these types of weapons. A copy of Flayderman's is always good to have around, as well. ;) (I highly recommend Flayderman's Guide for anyone with any interest in older firearms.)

Regarding a schematic or piece-by-piece walk through or manual on most of the old systems, it would likely have to be a modern work. It would have to be done in the interest of a study in sharing data. Back in those days, folks didn't really need manuals and such, due to the fact that things were designed with the idea that the user could service the item. Not alot of intricate moving parts, etc.

The inner workings of both Colt and Remington pistols (for example) are few and fairly robust. In the many years of shooting various models, the only part that actually broke (not counting regular and expected wear on certain items) was the small spring on the "hand" (a small moving part in the shield that indexes the cylinder when the action is cocked) snapped on an 1860 Colt repro. It took about 30 seconds to replace (even with a broken hand spring, the pistol was still perfectly serviceable. It just had to be cocked with the muzzle pointing down for the hand to engage the notches on the cylinder). Again, easily serviced and fixed. Everything tears down with the removal of just a half dozen or so screws.

Best way to learn about these things is to just use them, handle them, and tear them apart and rebuild. Repros come with blow-ups of the various parts for ease in reordering.

Hope this helps, and I'd be happy to answer any question I may know the answer to. I'm not too bright, but even a blind pig will find an acorn on occasion.
 
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