One Sixth Warriors Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
1:6 Acquisitionist
Joined
·
12,917 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know the answer to this question, but . . .

Seriously . . . one can actually make $ in this hobby provided one has the appropriate capital/seed money, patience/time, and willing to put some effort into properly working in selling 1:6 stuff?

Why in the world am I asking/posting about this?

I spent the part of the afternoon organizing & sorting a variety of 1:6 stuff I accumulated over the years and more recently.

I primarily buy and if ever rarely sell. Given the collection/inventory/stock whatever one is inclined to call it, I said out loud today . . . "DAMN. I got a lot $%^&!."

Does this mean I'm about to start selling? No.

I spent the evening doing some basic searches on eBay for starters to take a look at what is supposedly selling based on listings and based on what I actually have.

I have stuff that's not on eBay with any regularity thus far in terms of older stuff or in demand/sold out stuff.

No matter how one chooses to post & sell their stuff, there are pitfalls & risks involved considering the atmosphere for our particular hobby. It's a buyer's market right now and not inclined toward sellers unless the seller specifically has something other collectors actually & willingly want and will pay for.

With that said, can one actually make $ (not a living) selling 1:6 stuff?
 

·
Cobra Infantry Commander
Joined
·
3,785 Posts
what we need are more gas masks and knee/elbow pads for sale on eBay, and more Law Enforcement, and fire/rescue figures!
 

·
RodrigoViali
Joined
·
520 Posts
Hard call on this...I am on the same way ...I have some many stuff I accumulated probably a fortune...but if you sell you might need on the future...I like to put bash together have many option combination available...and time to time I change something on the figure....once a bash is never ended...unless I needed the money I would keep then:doh:knock:wideyes
 

·
Kit-Bash Krazy!
Joined
·
2,980 Posts
I've seen over the past two years, new people flock to this hobby thinking they can make money out of it, then they realise it's not the pot of gold they thought, and they disappear. For the vast majority of the good retailers out there, this hobby is a passion to them and it just about pays the bills but certainly doesn't afford them a lavish lifestyle.

As a private seller, I often list the odd piece left over from a boxed figure that I don't want, to recoup some of the cost of that figure; and usually you get a good price on eBay, often more than the retailer does via their shop for the same loose item... go figure!?
 
G

·
you can, but it's sporadic, I think. I get a good regular income from doing a nice easy job. I've done a few portraits and paintings in the past for friends and collegues, and a couple of figures, made a little bit of money, but you'd have to be doing it constantly to make an actual "regular living" out of it.

I think I'd hate doing that. Would suck all the fun out of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,946 Posts
That depends if you are talking casual sales or retail sales as a business, and what your expectations for potential profit would be.

If you read interviews of such retailers (such as 4defcon's) and comments by other retailers on the forums you'd get the idea that a) a retail store is too much overhead for this niche b) it is capital intensive due to the nature of how the product is made and distributed and c) online sales would make up the majority of sales.

It would probably be more appropriate to think of it as a dividend producing investment rather than a traditional positive cash flow retail business.

Given a sizeable older private collection such as yours, one could certainly make money selling the product they didn't want but you'd have to be very careful to factor in all of your costs, of which there are more than first comes to mind.

As mentioned, unless its a passion (product and selling), then it probably isn't worth pursuing other than casually selling off parts of the collection no longer wanted.
 

·
OSW Admin staff
Joined
·
5,758 Posts
I think it all depends on where you are at in the hobby. Are you a dealer? Distributor? private seller?

Are you established or just starting out? Store front or basement? One man, two or more?

So many questions...

I have to say this though, having a store front will kill you unless you either sell other collectables or comics. Or have very cheap rent.

Almost all of your business will come though the internet so now you have the added expensive of shipping and all the problems that come with that.

Almost everything you could sell, is being sold by everyone else so how do you compete to be better then the next dealer? Cheaper prices?
 

·
Resisting Evil
Joined
·
5,730 Posts
Never make your hobby a business....you'll come to hate your hobby......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
Can you make a profit - yes. Is it going to be substantial, probably not unless you get lucky and are patient (blade, hawk eye) Can you make a living out of 1/6 alone....I'd be surprised to unlikely, just due to limitations of the market. Are you going to be left with stock, at least loose, yes.

I think the key is in an ability to make quality parts people want, and your sales strategy around them (volume vs.availability vs. cost).
 

·
its time to musk up...
Joined
·
1,023 Posts
I know people who do very well from selling in this hobby, but if your just selling breakdowns then there's not much money to be made unless you are sitting on an inventory of older harder to find items.
Also having a good user base of customers that limit your need to sell on ebay would help, I just sold on ebay and its crazy how much the fees mount up
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,778 Posts
I know the answer to this question, but . . .

Seriously . . . one can actually make $ in this hobby provided one has the appropriate capital/seed money, patience/time, and willing to put some effort into properly working in selling 1:6 stuff?

Why in the world am I asking/posting about this?

I spent the part of the afternoon organizing & sorting a variety of 1:6 stuff I accumulated over the years and more recently.

I primarily buy and if ever rarely sell. Given the collection/inventory/stock whatever one is inclined to call it, I said out loud today . . . "DAMN. I got a lot $%^&!."

Does this mean I'm about to start selling? No.

I spent the evening doing some basic searches on eBay for starters to take a look at what is supposedly selling based on listings and based on what I actually have.

I have stuff that's not on eBay with any regularity thus far in terms of older stuff or in demand/sold out stuff.

No matter how one chooses to post & sell their stuff, there are pitfalls & risks involved considering the atmosphere for our particular hobby. It's a buyer's market right now and not inclined toward sellers unless the seller specifically has something other collectors actually & willingly want and will pay for.

With that said, can one actually make $ (not a living) selling 1:6 stuff?
Sell? I would. Cause if it's just sitting there then why not? I "thinned" out my loose parts in my sales thread. And it wasn't a lot of stuff to be honest and I took home some cash on some sales. Ultimately, It is worth it but it has to be the stuff that sells.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,814 Posts
I know the answer to this question, but . . .

Seriously . . . one can actually make $ in this hobby provided one has the appropriate capital/seed money, patience/time, and willing to put some effort into properly working in selling 1:6 stuff?

Why in the world am I asking/posting about this?

I spent the part of the afternoon organizing & sorting a variety of 1:6 stuff I accumulated over the years and more recently.

I primarily buy and if ever rarely sell. Given the collection/inventory/stock whatever one is inclined to call it, I said out loud today . . . "DAMN. I got a lot $%^&!."

Does this mean I'm about to start selling? No.

I spent the evening doing some basic searches on eBay for starters to take a look at what is supposedly selling based on listings and based on what I actually have.

I have stuff that's not on eBay with any regularity thus far in terms of older stuff or in demand/sold out stuff.

No matter how one chooses to post & sell their stuff, there are pitfalls & risks involved considering the atmosphere for our particular hobby. It's a buyer's market right now and not inclined toward sellers unless the seller specifically has something other collectors actually & willingly want and will pay for.

With that said, can one actually make $ (not a living) selling 1:6 stuff?
Kind of on topic: What ever happen to the figure release you were trying to do?? It had some interest.
 

·
1:6 Acquisitionist
Joined
·
12,917 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Kind of on topic: What ever happen to the figure release you were trying to do?? It had some interest.
--

The torch was passed on to another enterprising individual.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,115 Posts
You've already spent ALOT of money
You can recoup some of your money and make room in your house for a comfortable chair
Some things you have you can make a profit on
Most things --- you will probably take a loss

How much of a profit can you make on the few things that are rare and desireable ?
How much of a loss are you willing to take on the majority of the stuff ?
How much cash do you need to put back in your pocket ?
How badly do you need to clear that space in your home ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
522 Posts
I'm not so much replying directly to the OP as DeltaForceChung stated because I think he understands the question fully. I'm choosing more to blab on about the idea of making serious money off toy/figure collecting because it is such a big issue in the hobby. The chance to make nice money is always there but the reality is probably much more bleak. It's all a crap shoot of gambling at best.

Collectibles have an illusion of money and profit built into them because there's a natural assumption of appreciating value. I mean that's why they are called "collectibles" because they are somehow rare and niche interest. Sure they go up in value but do you have the time and money to flip a hobby into a profitable business? Everyone I've ever known who was in the toys or comic business (let's be honest we're talking about all the proud nerd collectibles here) have admitted to chasing their tails in the market trying to find, retain and flip products for a big profit.

When it comes to 1:6 stuff your investment starts at around $200 a pop (not including taxes and shipping) to then hope it will accumulate in value to more than double at least. If you're not sitting on 3 or 4 Hawkeyes, Blades, Wolverines, POTA, or certain Iron Man figures then you don't have much at all. If you don't have select gems you're only bound to break even or make $50 more than what you paid for each of the stinkers. Some you might have to unload to break even or possibly lose a bit on. For every hot figure worth double what you paid there will be some for which get you get nothing back but your initial investment, or even worse some loss. Suddenly a percentage of each Hawkeye is just offsetting the loss from each new Predator, POTC Angelica, City Hunter, New Goblin, Sweeney Todd or Red Skull.

Keep in mind you have to store stock somewhere and allow it time to accumulate in value. The physical burdens of space and time in this business are a bit staggering. Both space and time coupled (no sci-fi puns intended) represent money being lost on a constant basis - space and time that could be allocated to something less static and burdening. It's called dead stock and it starts to eat up space and time. And remember you're constantly losing interest on money you could have invested more wisely. You have to spend a lot of time occupied with this business in advertising and seeking buyers then shipping and delivering. Time you could have spent working and making a wage.

You also have to be very sharp at selling at the right time. Look at how the price of the IM Mark I and II soared in value a couple of years back then plummeted when the version 2.0 of both of those were released. Now those original versions have jumped back up again. Try explaining that and finding a way to predict the best time to unload that stock at the best profit margin if you had it sitting around MIB. Until a couple of weeks ago the Dark Knight DX was way up there but since the Armoury set was announced that bad boy dropped dramatically. Lots of speculators sitting on it holding out for the price to keep rising but they got screwed. They're not losing money yet but furiously seeing the value drop suddenly. Is this the time to unload or wait from something else to change?

Finally the last factor worth looking at in the future of this hobby is how long collectors will be able to splurge on every figure that comes out. There are figures from a few years ago I always meant to buy but every month there is something new that I want more so the reality is I will probably never buy those old desirables unless I get them for a real bargain. The market is getting flooded and every collector is being challenged in their ability to spend more. Collectors will become much more selective and that behaviour will effect the price of supposedly "rare and valuable" figures.

The best words of wisdom I ever heard from a toy seller was to not get caught up in chasing new toys as a profit scheme. If you have that money available to spend you're better off investing in vintage toys which will always go up in value or better yet not throw your income at toys in at all. That kind of investment is better placed in stocks or something that has real and predictable appreciation. With toys you're gambling on high investment for little return and the burden of carrying dead stock indefinitely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
698 Posts
Oh boy, I have boxes and boxes of stuff that I've bought over the years and never used, intending them for certain projects but never quite getting around to them (having said that, there's been more than a few times when inspiration has hit, and already having the pieces on hand has worked out pretty well.)

Would I start selling stuff off? Maybe, if I lost my job or something. I figure when I finally do kick off, though, my next of kin know about my collection, maybe they can sell the stuff and make a small fortune and go on a nice trip or something! :lol
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top