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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everyone~

I've been working on this project back in September 2017, it's a pretty lengthy build (by my standards :p) and a little stressful at times, with mishaps here and there. But in the end, it was fun and a great learning experience.

Today, I'm really excited to share her with you. Meet Eve, the Cyber Girl.

(For full resolution click on images)




Video Showcase (HD):

The armor is made entirely out of polymer clay. Although I've made a couple of pieces with clay before (mostly minor accessories), this is a completely different approach for me, using this much clay in a single build. Just for fun, I counted the pieces of clay used in this build, it was a little over 150 pieces.

I apologize in advance, this is going to be a fairly long post since there's really a lot of content to show. I'm going to break them down into sections for your ease of viewing (or for you to skip to). Hope you can bear with me :)

1 Inspiration
2 Character Biography
3 Photos & Tech Showcase
4 Breakdown of Build Process


1. Inspiration

The idea for this character was inspired by the futuristic, dystopian and cyberpunk theme from movies such as Robocop, and Ghost in the Shell. On a visual perspective, I've been heavily inspired by various character from comics, video games, and artwork found online. But mostly these three: Gamora's Battle Armor (GoTG), Genji (Overwatch), and Cyborg Raiden (Metal Gear).



2. Fictional Character Biography:

A young prodigy with outstanding performance in the police force, but is often times hot-headed and brash.

During an attempt to arrest a major drug lord in the most dangerous part of the slums, she was gravely wounded and left to die. She was later found on the brink of death by the nearby patrol unit.

The committee took this as a chance to put her through experimental cybernetic surgery, where they attempted to fuse her into an enhanced synthetic body. While all of the prior test subjects were deemed failures, due to having weak cerebral integrity which lead to mental degradation. She proved to be different, her mind was surprisingly strong and her will unwavering, a stable cerebral connection could be achieved, she was successfully fused to the new body.

While partial cyberization is not so uncommon in society, usually they are limited to the more privileged class, and most notably among the law enforcement and the crime syndicates. Full-cyberization was unheard of, until recently. With this breakthrough, she became widely known as the first cyber human, and thus received a new name, Eve.

A few years later she was re-deployed back into service in a desperate attempt to turn the tides against the crime syndicate which maintained domination over large portion of the slums.

3. Photos & Tech Showcase:

Equipped with the highly advanced Nanosuit and state-of-the-art weaponry, she can hold her own against a group of armed thugs.

The suit's versatility is near limitless, it can be configured in various modes for different adaptations. Going into combat mode grants the user a higher degree of protection, but in exchange gives up agility and flexibility. In an event of a severe threat, the faceplate can be equipped to provide maximum protection and at the same time supply the user with useful tactical information through the visor and receivers.

With its modular design, newer and more advanced modules and parts can be later added down the line.

(For full resolution click on images)

Cyber Girl by Chaiyapat Hastanasombat, on Flickr
(Default/Patrol Mode)

Cyber Girl by Chaiyapat Hastanasombat, on Flickr
(Combat Mode)

Cyber Girl by Chaiyapat Hastanasombat, on Flickr
(Severe Threat Mode: Visor engaged)

Cyber Girl by Chaiyapat Hastanasombat, on Flickr
(Threat neutralized: Visor disengaged)

An energy shield can be deployed from the left gauntlet to provide extra protection or used in mass riots.

Cyber Girl by Chaiyapat Hastanasombat, on Flickr
(Energy shield deployed)

Cyber Girl by Chaiyapat Hastanasombat, on Flickr
(Riot Combat: Baton and energy shield deployed)

Cyber Girl by Chaiyapat Hastanasombat, on Flickr
(On patrol)

4. Work Progress Breakdown

Here I'll discuss the build procedure and the materials used. But first off, lets discuss the design. I wanted to strike a balance between aggressiveness (machine) and compassion (human), and to make her look sleek and futuristic at the same time.

The torso consists of curved and contoured pieces, and are placed in a form-fitting manner to give the body a softer definition. While the limbs contain sharper angles with more pronounced gaps in placement to appear more dynamic and aggressive.





With this design in mind, I started by wrapping the body in cling wrap, and then applied masking tape over it. The design is then drawn on directly. After I'm happy with the design, it's time to carefully cut out the masking tape to use it as a template.





After we have the template ready and separated into single pieces. Next step is to knead the polymer clay and roll it to the thickness we want. The whole armor consists of various degree of thickness for different parts. The hips are probably the thinnest, while the thickest is probably the chest piece. Some parts are more intricate than others, which requires several pieces to be overlaid or combined to create one single piece.





After each piece is cut, it is then placed on the body so that it can be "shaped" to conform to the body, and left overnight to dry (I'm using the no-bake/air-dry kind). When the clay has dried, the edges can be trimmed and the surface can be sanded if necessary.





There's quite a few textured parts. To make them, all you have to do is find an object with the desired texture, press the clay evenly on it to create an imprint (recessed texture will yield protruded textures, and vice versa). Next, remove the clay and allow to dry. In my case, the bumpy texture [1] is from a sporty watch band, while the honeycomb texture [2] is from the grill on a pair of headphones.





For the thigh piece, out of impulse, I opted for a different design to the initial sketch which was a three-piece design. It looked quite good on its own, but as soon as I tried them on the body, I didn't like it, so I scrapped it and went back to the original.




After most of the limbs completed, the knees and elbows were left. At this point I was probably burnt out, and decided to "copy" pieces from other existing figures. I did this by using a mold making material from a Japanese dollar store (where you put it in hot water, and it softens up and you can cast it onto pieces you want to copy) to create molds of an Iron Man MK9's knee pad.

After successfully copying a small section (only the red part) of the knee pad, I trimmed it off a bit and placed on the knee, funny thing is, it looked better on her elbows than on her knees.





Decided to skip the knee for later. Next up is the chin piece, this piece was one of the most intricate in the build (consisting of 7 individual pieces). I've managed to place a pair of small magnets inside the sections close to the ears. Another pair are hidden inside the base of the antenna (the hexagonal part) so that they can be attached magnetically.





Last few pieces were the knees, clavicle area (not sure if correct term), neck and throat. Knees are a three-piece design, so it opens up and fold, allowing articulation. A single piece for the neck, with three additional plates along the throat. Lastly the clavicle piece was added to make it look more balanced, in the final results I added strap-like pieces to connect it to the back armor, and added clasps for more realism.





This sums up the sculpting process, and on to the painting process. Normally, I like to paint most of my work by hand, but with these many pieces and wanting to achieve finer results, I had to pick up on using an airbrush. (I haven't been accustomed to using an airbrush much)





I went with white as the primary color, with a dash of red to give it accent, black is mostly reserved for the textured parts. Titanium color was used on the more critical spots or high-impact areas to make them seemed "reinforced" (spine, throat, knee caps, elbow pads, and the back of the hands).

Last touch was to give the piece a bit more details and realism by adding some decals. I used a sheet of waterslide decals for a PG-grade Gundam to spruce up the armor. (Decals are better shown in the video)


(From start to finish: [1]: Bodysuit. [2]: Fully fitted, unpainted. [3]: Fully painted and decals applied)

So that sums up everything. I hope this post isn't too long and boring, if you've read though it all, I would like to wholeheartedly thank you for your time and interest in my project.

Hope you all have a wonderful day! :D
 

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Re: [Sci-fi] Cyber Girl: Futuristic Armor (fully scratch built) [Long Post]

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Heya Fox915!

That is some truly AMAZING work... concept, backstory, craftsmanship and photography!

Thanx for sharing this piece of art!
.
 

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Re: [Sci-fi] Cyber Girl: Futuristic Armor (fully scratch built) [Long Post]

Holy crap! This is some truly unbelievable work! The design is so slick and clean, and executed so flawlessly. It's freakin gorgeous, and I'm in complete awe. And I love the photos and backstory! Seriously some next level craftsmanship.
 

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Re: [Sci-fi] Cyber Girl: Futuristic Armor (fully scratch built) [Long Post]

Woow! Such fantastic painstaking work and an awesome design! Thanks so much for the step-by-step tuitorial too Fox915. May I know the brand of the polymer clay you use?
 

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Re: [Sci-fi] Cyber Girl: Futuristic Armor (fully scratch built) [Long Post]

I instantly recognized that armor as being inspired by Gamora. That is some amazing work!
 

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Re: [Sci-fi] Cyber Girl: Futuristic Armor (fully scratch built) [Long Post]

WOW. Honestly, this is one of the finest sci-fi armor builds I've ever seen. Your WIP pics make it look so easy, but getting those clean lines and smooth finish in clay is incredibly tough. Great work! The figure is very stylish and cool, too!
 

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Re: [Sci-fi] Cyber Girl: Futuristic Armor (fully scratch built) [Long Post]

HOLY $^%&!

January KOTM nomination and winner! I'm calling it already.

This is truly awesome!

Well done and THANK YOU! for posting/sharing this.
 

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Re: [Sci-fi] Cyber Girl: Futuristic Armor (fully scratch built) [Long Post]

Wow! I am impressed, Fox915. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Re: [Sci-fi] Cyber Girl: Futuristic Armor (fully scratch built) [Long Post]

definitely the coolest custom of 2018 so far. have to say, that you knocked it out of the park.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Re: [Sci-fi] Cyber Girl: Futuristic Armor (fully scratch built) [Long Post]

.
Heya Fox915!

That is some truly AMAZING work... concept, backstory, craftsmanship and photography!

Thanx for sharing this piece of art!
.
Holy crap! This is some truly unbelievable work! The design is so slick and clean, and executed so flawlessly. It's freakin gorgeous, and I'm in complete awe. And I love the photos and backstory! Seriously some next level craftsmanship.
Outstanding!
Fantastic work :thumb Very impressive job on the custom armour. The tutorial/Work In Progress shots are just awesome.
damn fine work
Jaw dropping skills you have! Truly impressive from the ground up!
Wow! I am impressed, Fox915. Thanks for sharing.
Brilliant work man! I love the chinplate!
Super super super impressed!
definitely the coolest custom of 2018 so far. have to say, that you knocked it out of the park.
WOW! Very Cool, Great job!
Thank you so much my friends, for taking the time going through my project, reading my story, and for your kind and generous comments :D

I instantly recognized that armor as being inspired by Gamora. That is some amazing work!
You have very sharp eyes my friend. I fell in love with her design the moment I saw the artwork online :)

WOW. Honestly, this is one of the finest sci-fi armor builds I've ever seen. Your WIP pics make it look so easy, but getting those clean lines and smooth finish in clay is incredibly tough. Great work! The figure is very stylish and cool, too!
Thank you ZombieKev, I really appreciate it. Seeing your Conan figure recently, it's truly inspirational, the amount of time I put into this pales in comparison to your dedication :p I truly admire that :)

HOLY $^%&!

January KOTM nomination and winner! I'm calling it already.

This is truly awesome!

Well done and THANK YOU! for posting/sharing this.
Thank you so much DFC, it really means a lot to me, coming from you :)

Fantastic...this is what the hobby is about....
Thank you crusader1xxx, your scratch builds are truly phenomenal and inspirational :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Re: [Sci-fi] Cyber Girl: Futuristic Armor (fully scratch built) [Long Post]

Woow! Such fantastic painstaking work and an awesome design! Thanks so much for the step-by-step tuitorial too Fox915. May I know the brand of the polymer clay you use?
To answer Martian's question, and expand on the details of the materials.

I used clay bought from the Daiso store (Japanese 100yen/dollar store).



I would highly recommend to look/research into other leading brands that most sculpting artists seem to use first. I suspect the quality should be marginally better, you should get more for what you pay for.

I'm only using this option because, it was the only choice I had, the local stores in my area don't cary named brand clay. Also because I had some leftovers and thought I'd play around with it, until the project really took off and I found I had to go out and get more of the same ones for consistency.

But if you have better materials or have access to a 3D printer, that should be substantially better in terms of durability. As I've found the clay I've used to be somewhat brittle, especially the thinnest piece broke in half when I dropped it, but the thicker pieces seem to hold up well enough.

Also the clay doesn't have much give, bending or flexing the clay itself can induce cracks or it might even break off completely. Having said that, this figure isn't that affected in terms of poseability, due to the pieces tend to move in conjunction with the figure.

Since I'm no expert, I can't recommend much which material is best since I haven't tried any other options.

As for the mold making material that I've used to duplicate the Ironman MK9's knee pad, I've seen the Japanese artist online labelled them "Katatori-kun". The one I got was also from Daiso, it's labelled "Plastic clay" or "Oyumaru".

 
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