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Below are my pictures of a Rebel Yell, a private of the 1st Tennessee Infantry Regiment at the last moments of a bayonet charge at the Battle of Perryville.

The figure and all equipment is SST except the blanket roll and base that are custom. I originally built this figure as the 1st Maryland (CSA). But one of the benefits of our hobby is that you can modify the figure very easily. So with a little effort the figure became a typical mid-war Reb infantry. I labeled him as 1st Tenn. although he is typical of just about every regiment in the Army of the Tennessee (CSA). (There was nothing unique about the 1st Tenn uniform)

The figure is held in place by a wood screw through the base and inserted into his foot. The ankle is held in it's position by milliput clay.













The 1st Tenn. was one of the CSA's hard fighting regiments. Their supreme test came at the now all-but-forgotten Battle of Perryville. A summary of their charge is below:

On August 19, Bragg threw his plan into effect and the Army of Tennessee moved north over Walden's Ridge through Sparta, into Kentucky. For unknown reasons, many of the men in Company D were not present during the Kentucky Campaign. They still should have had between 50-75 men on their rolls yet only 38 were there. George Nichols later wrote he was sick and left at Chattanooga, whether this is the case for the rest of the men is unknown. Confederate records are very lacking for most of the war, and unless a soldier recorded his experiences, it is hard to tell what he did.
In September they crossed the Kentucky State border North of Nashville and began a race with the Federals to Louisville on the Ohio River. They moved up through Camp Dick Robinson, a major Union Supply base, and Munfordsville, a short time after the battle occurred there. The armies, were nearing Louisville, the Federals got there first.
Bragg moves his army east to link up with Kirby Smith and reaches Bardstown. On October 1, the Federals move south from Louisville in pursuit of the Confederates. Bragg then moves through Danville and Harrodsburg during early October. Both sides face a major problem, there has been a drought in the weather lately and both sides need water. Both sides find it at Perryville. On October 7 Bragg moves part of his army to Perryville and finds part of the Federal army camped a few miles outside the city. He decides the next day he will strike them.
On October 8, 1862 at around 7:00 a.m. the regiment is ordered to cook rations. As the day passes they are ordered to march forward and cross the Chaplin River at Walker's Bend. On the other side, Maney's Brigade is drawn up with the 6th TN, 9th TN, and 41st GA in the front line and the 1st and 27th TN in the rear line. At around 3:30 p.m. Maney sends his front line in. Turner's Battery unlimbered on a hill and blasts the Open Hill containing Terrill's Federal Brigade, and Parson's Battery. Mean while the 38 men present in Company D stand there in the ranks of the regiment and wait anxiously while a full scale assault rages just ahead of them. The Federals manage to grind the Confederates to a halt. To take the Open Hill, Maney will need his whole force.
Maney orders the 1st and 27th forward to flank the Federals. The regiment nears the fighting and only to see the front line surge over the hill and rout the Federals who flee abandoning all but one of the artillery pieces on the hill. Most of the Federals retreat through Starkweather's Brigade on a hill about a quarter of a mile to their rear.
Perryville is a series of rolling hills. After you go over one hill, there is another one waiting on you. It is a defender's paradise. The terrain enabled brigades to fight twice their number and men can easily be hidden behind the hills. Starkweather's Brigade stood ready to engage Maney and Stewart (who had come up on Maney's left). Maney forms his Brigade into one line, with the 1st TN on the extreme right.
The order to attack Starkweather's Hill is given at around 4:00 p.m. and the soldiers of the 1st TN push and stomp through cornstalks moving towards the Benton Road at the summit of the hill brushing aside the remnants of a beat up Federal unit. Quickly, the regiment forms with the Benton Road to their left and Lieutenant Colonel Patterson leads the regiment forward against the hill. Bush's 4th Indiana Battery opens a barrage on the regiment and switches to canister as they draw near. One blast of canister kills most of the color guard and wounds Lt. Colonel Patterson in the hand. Another blast sends a piece of grapeshot through Patterson's moustache tearing through his head while he bandages his hand wound with a handkerchief. 4th Sergeant James R. Hughes is struck in the thigh by grapeshot in the same attack. The regiment continues forward until the Indiana Battery can no longer depress their guns to fire on the regiment. Sensing an opportunity, they rush forward and Captain Bush quickly calls for the 1st Wisconsin's aid, the regiment to their rear. Both the 1st TN and 1st WI collide around Bush's guns.

The charge of the 1st TN at this time succeeds in driving the 1st WI and Bush's Artillerists away from their cannons leaving them in Confederate possession. Their success is cut short, with Patterson dead and the regiment disorganized, confusion sets in and they fall back down the hill. The 1st WI quickly moves up and recaptures the battery. Starkweather fearing Maney's Confederates might take the hill orders all cannons to the rear. At the same time Confederate Artillery fires from the Open Hill and begins decimating Bush's Artillery. Between the artillery and the 1st TN most of Bush's horses are dead, and he can only bring off two of his four guns.
Colonel Feild who was with General Maney during the attack rides to the 1st TN and rallies them. Calmly, he advances the regiment and they again move up the hill. As they near the top the 1st WI and what few men of Bush's Artillerymen are left, retreat to a hill just behind Starkweather's. With their adrenaline up, the 1st TN charges down the other side of the hill after them in pursuit. In doing so, they isolate themselves from the rest of the Confederate forces still engaged at the hill.

As the 1st TN advanced, the Federals were preparing a new line on the hill behind Starkweather's. Stone's and what was left of Bush's Artillery were set up there. The 24th IL was in the process of falling back and turns their rifles on them. The 79th PA was in perfect firing range of the 1st TN also. The 1st TN halts in the cornfield between the two hills and here they pay for advancing so far ahead. 2nd Sergeant Meredith P.G. Winstead and Private James R. Neely are both shot through the legs side by side. Scores of others go down. Here the regiment takes the most causalities and evidence suggests so does Company D.
The Federals seem to become inspired by the way they are butchering the regiment. John Durham, of the 1st WI, becomes motivated by the moment and grabs his regiment's flag and runs out between the two regiments and plants the flag. He later won the Medal of Honor for his actions. The 1st WI rushes forward, and hits the 1st TN. Private Morris S. Rice, of Company H 1st WI, rushes the color bearer of the 1st TN and seizes the flag and quickly bears it back to his lines. By this time the 1st TN is too beat up to resist. They retreat from the field in a fashion that Colonel Feild later described as, "better then could be expected." They make their way back to the Benton Road. 2nd Corporal Frank Womble leads Company D to the rear, every Officer and NCO above him is dead or wounded.
What is left of Maney's Brigade and part of Stewart's Brigade finally force the Federals to retreat from Starkweather's Hill. The 1st WI pursues the 1st TN to the hill where they grab every artillery piece that they can before the rest of the Confederates overwhelm them. During the initial attack against Starkweather's Hill both the 27th TN and 41st GA become so shot up they were pulled back to the Open Hill. Now with the 1st TN beat up and retreating, Maney is left with just the 6th and 9th TN who are nearly out of ammunition and one more attack will make them useless as fighting units like his other three regiments. Here Maney's Brigade halts and is effectively out of the fight. Nearly, half the brigade is dead or wounded and the 1st TN has suffered worst.
 

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Another amazing work there Zouave. Though I do not have vey much interest in the ACW when I first came into the hobby, I can say otherwise now, and that is mostly because of your work. Looking forward to the next one. :thumb
 

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wave man TDY staff
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That's a dynamic presentation, CZ, and one of the prettiest ACW figures I've seen. The blanket really looks great.
I visited Perryville some years ago, and it's a battlefield worth having a walk about. Unfortunately my trip was cut short by rampaging twisters (prolly followed me from Kansas).
 

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Silent Hunter
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CZ, you definately caught the moment with this one. Fantastic figure and pose.
 

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Walk in Beauty
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Crazy work CZ, tell us how did you get him to stay in that great pose?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
getting the dyanic pose isn't all that hard if you know the tricks. The ankle is held in place by milliput clay. If you look close at the detail you can see the hardened clay around his ankle.



The clay cones in two parts. Mix them together and it will harden in about 30 minutes. It's as hard as a rock and does a great job at holding the ankle in place. But that means you need to do some advance planning and get the ankle in the final position you want. Next you fix the knee in position. I used shipping tape wrapped around his knee. That gave me some more flexibility than glue since I could repostiotion his knee. Then I used a wood screw through the base into the base or heel of his foot. The wood screw needs to be the right length to go through the wood and about 1/4 to 3/8 into his heel. I cut small hole into the boot heel to allow the screw to pass. And one other piece of advice. The figure is leaning so far out from the base that its center of gravity is too far to an edge and it almost (but not quite) wants to tip over. So do a little advance planning with the location of the foot and CG before you start drilling. Even if you do get it wrong, you can always unscrew the figure , drill a new hole, relocate the figure and cover your mistake with grass. Not that that ever happened to me.
 

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Pimpin' ain't easy
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Dude, this fig is freakin' dope!
You guys are really inspiring me for the bashes I want to do.
 
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