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The Highland Light Infantry was a regiment of the British Army from 1881 to 1959. In 1923 the regimental title was expanded to the Highland Light Infantry (City of Glasgow Regiment)

The regiment was formed as part of the Childers reforms on 1 July 1881 by the amalgamation of the 71st (Highland) Light Infantry and the 74th (Highlanders) Regiment of Foot as the city regiment of Glasgow, absorbing the local militia and rifle volunteer units. Its exact status was a somewhat ambiguous one - although the regiment insisted on being classified as a non-kilted Highland regiment, it recruited mainly from Glasgow in Lowland Scotland.

The HLI (as it was always known) continued in service, actively taking part in the First and Second World Wars, until it was amalgamated with the Royal Scots Fusiliers in 1959 to form the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment).

The HLI have a memorial dedicated to the men who fell in the Boer War in Kelvingrove Park, in the West End of Glasgow. The HLI have had a long association with Kelvingrove as various battalions drilled there well into the 20th century. The HLI barracks were situated in the Maryhill area of the city, just a stone's throw from the park. The statue depicts a khaki-clad soldier reaching for his rifle as he hears approaching danger.



This figure is based on a post card illustration I found in the Royal Highland Fusiliers museum which is situated on Sauchiehall Street in the heart of Glasgow City Centre. If you ever find yourself in Glasgow, I recommend it for a visit. Despite it's small shop-front appearance, it covers two floors and spans the regiment's creation to modern times. It houses an excellent collection of uniforms and weapons from all the conflicts the HLI have been involved with.



The illustration shows a private from the 1st Battalion, in Marching Order-South Africa, May 1900. The painting is by Douglas N. Anderson.
The soldier is wearing the later issue khaki serge uniform which was far better wearing than the lighter khaki drill uniform seen earlier in the war. His foreign service helmet has been replaced with a slouch hat.
He is armed with the Lee Enfield Mk1 which replaced the Lee Metford after it was found the newly developed cordite powder corroded the Metford rifling. He wears the 1888 pattern waistbelt and braces and the 1897 ammunition bandolier which replaced the belt-worn pouches. His haversack is the 1883 General Service model and he wears the 1895 iron waterbottle on his right hip. His mess tin sits on top of his rolled greatcoat, strapped to the rear of his waist belt.

This figure is based on this illustration.



I've used a Barrack Sargeant body with a DML head and Sideshow hands. The head has had a repaint and a moustache added. His waterbottle is made from Balsa wood and covered with material. The sling is made from the same leather as all his other white equipment.



His uniform, which is lighter than in the photos, is the Sideshow WW1 U.S Officer's with a bit of pocket rearrangement. I replaced the Sideshow buttons with ones from Battlegear Toys. The puttees are fabric from the bits box and the boots come from one of the other Sideshow WW1 figures (can't remember which) His slouch hat is scratchbuilt, following one of Tony Bartons tutorials, with a silk pugree, chinstrap and one of Tony's cap badges added.



His waistbelt and ammo bandolier are scratchbuilt using leather from Little Trimmings in the U.K. The small brass fastening studs on the bandolier are from the Bead Cafe. I've tried to fill as many of the loops with BBi bullets as I can.



I modified a DiD Napoleonic haversack here and added a scratchbuilt strap with buckles.



His MK1 Lee Enfield is a hybrid of a BBi MK3 SMLE and a Sideshow Lebel. I took off the Lebel's muzzle and replaced it with some brass tubing for greater strength. The dial sight and other fittings came from Tony.



I used Milliput over the handle and blade of the BBi bayonet to achieve the right shape for the 1888 pattern bayonet. It can be detached from the rifle.
The rifle's sling is painted leather. The sliders work.



His messtin, made by Tony again, sits in a painted canvas carrier on top of his rolled greatcoat which was pilfered from a DiD Napoleonic backpack.

Instead of filling his haversack with junk for bulk and weight, I thought it would be fun to fill it up with some useful bits and pieces.



He carries with him his holder which contains his cutlery, spare boots laces and boot polish. It would also hold his shaving materials and other personal items. He has a few rations to keep him going such as condensed milk, biscuits, packet soup and cocoa. He also has field dressings and two spare packets of ammunition. There are even a couple of letters from home.



Here it is about to be packed up ready to go on the march.

Hope you like the figure and all his bits and pieces. All comments are welcome.

Cheers
Andy
 

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Fantastic! This is my period-I have countless painted miniatures, paintings, books, etc on this subject. I can safely say you have him down cold! Excellent research-down to the stuffings in the haversack!!

I feel all warm and fuzzy right now. Wonderful stuff!

You have a PM by the way...

Mike.:banana
 

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Furious Genius
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Absolutely splendid! Not only great work on your figure but love the extra mile you went by adding the soldier's personal holdall, rations, etc.
 

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wave man TDY staff
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Truely incredible work Andy, so much detail. That bandoleer is a particular gem. Your usual fine talent brought to this period.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thankyou all for the comments. The haversack bits and pieces were fiddly but fun. I was amazed they all fitted in!

Cheers
Andy
 

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Amazing work! :wideyes I love all of the many details that went into making this figure so outstanding. :thumb
 
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