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Average Guy
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Has anyone ever watched this documentary? The guy made a huge town and tons of 1/6 figures to help him recover from a beating that almost killed him and left him brain damaged. There are plenty of Dragon figures to be found in his dios. I find it very interesting, just what he was able to do. Plus he was a Sailor once upon a time.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1391092/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marwencol

I ran a search and didn't find anything, if I missed something I apologize.
 

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1/6 Junkie since 1998
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Yes I saw it and it is very cool.I know him from Greenleaders's board and even have a figure of myself in his 1/6 scale world.He is a great guy and does some pretty cool storylines and is a really good with a camera.I think it is still up on Netflix and well worth a look ......
 

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Average Guy
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well shoot. My search fu must be very weak. I just came across it randomly on Netflix and thought 'ow wow I've never seen anything showing 1/6 stuff before'. It was an interesting watch for sure.
 

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One of the residents of Marwencol is "Tank Mechanic".Sent him a Jeep and a few odds and ends in the early days.His stories continue on GL's board.
 

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IS HE LIVE OR IS HE DEAD?
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That one is still on netflix [or was a week or so ago anyway]. I watched it back when if first was mentioned on this board.
Another 1:6 film [that also used to be on netflix] is Jackboots on Whitehall.
 

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I have watched this documentary, it was very sad what happened to him but also very cool how he made a figure for people he met. It touched me when he was talking about how he walks with his jeep sometimes.
 

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I had huge problems with it as a documentary, but his story is interesting and it was fun seeing his work on the big screen.

He used to post here, yeah? He def used to post at some board I hung out at.
 

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Say what?
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I watched it last evening with my kids.

The boy definitely has talent and some cool stuff.

The movie is really not my genre, but I appreciate it for what it is. Interestingly, people seem very tolerant of him, given the circumstance. As my younger son said, "he seems to be obsessed with women." And, indeed he does.

However, I'd much rather hang with someone obsessed with women than a raging alcoholic, which is apparently where he was before the beating.

I was mightily impressed with his abilities to get a natural looking poses out of his figures. He really is a genius at that.
 

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It had an agenda, and mixed some info into it that wasn't super accurate. It's been a couple years since I've seen it (saw it at SIFF here whenever it premiered) but I had some other issues.

The uh, poverty angle too bothered me. Even at the time he bought some of those figs, they weren't like ever a cheap hobby. Not cheap as the barbie dolls (I also had an issue with the barbie doll stuff personally, which I felt altered his intent some from altruistic and innocent to something, but that was personal) he had, which also can be kinda expensive. But yeah, this hobby is nothing I would ever consider cheap, and yet they had it sounding like he could barely get by etc. I dunno, there were lots of little things. It was more of a reality show drama than a documentary, it did very little in presenting an unbiased look at this story, which is fine that it didn't, but I tend to prefer forming my own opinions on a subject and not the ones the filmmakers went into it predetermined to tell me.

See also King of Kong for another example of this.
 

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1:6 Acquisitionist
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It had an agenda, and mixed some info into it that wasn't super accurate. It's been a couple years since I've seen it (saw it at SIFF here whenever it premiered) but I had some other issues.

The uh, poverty angle too bothered me. Even at the time he bought some of those figs, they weren't like ever a cheap hobby. Not cheap as the barbie dolls (I also had an issue with the barbie doll stuff personally, which I felt altered his intent some from altruistic and innocent to something, but that was personal) he had, which also can be kinda expensive. But yeah, this hobby is nothing I would ever consider cheap, and yet they had it sounding like he could barely get by etc. I dunno, there were lots of little things. It was more of a reality show drama than a documentary, it did very little in presenting an unbiased look at this story, which is fine that it didn't, but I tend to prefer forming my own opinions on a subject and not the ones the filmmakers went into it predetermined to tell me.

See also King of Kong for another example of this.
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I concur on erechoveraker's observations/points.

To me it's not about the 1:6 hobby. The 1:6 hobby is used as a plot device with regards to the individual and I have some caveats about the individual and the one sided agenda with regards to the documentary.

To think that Hollywood wants to make a feature film on the guy and his hobby?
 

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We'll see if it actually happens. Ben Stiller and co were going to adapt King of Kong at one point into a film, but I believe that's mostly dead now too.

Another issue I had was the notion the flick set forth that this guy this solitary life and nobody knew about his little town, another complete fiction. He def posted (here?) and on a few other boards for a year or so, and shopped from the same dealers we all do. People were aware of his work, which is how the filmmakers found out about his stuff as I recall. Again, minor point, but I'm not a fan of a documentary having an agenda in overly sympathizing the protagonist by altering facts. I don't need a good vs evil scenario in what is supposed to be a display of actual life stuff. How many of us actually deal with good vs evil in such black and white frames in our day to day lives? It's all about subtlety, the struggles and triumphs of life, redemption, comfort and understanding, those issues ring more true than the notions of you know, a lone misunderstood hero vs his arch enemy or whatever.

Blah, I ragged about this a lot when it came out, sure I could go on more. Ultimately it was an interesting story, and in ways uplifting, but the lack of awareness of the 1/6th hobby and cost etc the filmmakers presented sort of cast his hobby in an additionally pathetic light, like lookit this weirdo who plays with dolls (although honestly, Mark didn't help much to dispel that idea with stuff he said/did) which is just dumb. They do that stuff with comics, and to artists, and anyone considered nerdy or whatever. As if liking Star Trek/Wars makes you some kind of outcast, yes you like some of the highest grossing most profitable franchises in the history of America, what a strange outsider you are *rolls eyes*.

ETC.
 

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And yet nobody considers people who collect stamps, or coins, or baseball cards to be outcasts, yeah? I mean, it's just the slanting of perspective a bit, and I felt like instead of understanding it more, the filmmakers accentuated the preconceived notions about it.

I mean, they advertise collector plates and ships in bottles in TV Guide, People magazine etc. Collecting is just that. Shrug. Just my take.
 

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1:6 Philanthropist
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Oh I agree with you completely! I mean, anytime I bring up 1/6th in a conversation, which is not too often, unless its with someone who is a history buff. The subject almost ALWAYS goes to Marwencol.

"So its like Marwencol?"

"Do you have a town with women?"

I think that most people just don't understand collecting that aren't into it. I'm not just talking about collecting vinyl or sneakers. We, as model makers, and history enthusiasts have an attention to detail that most people do not have.
 
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