One Sixth Warriors Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
wave man TDY staff
Joined
·
41,776 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Years ago, in a book I have on War Movies, I'd read a short description about a British film titled "Went the Day Well ?" Turner Classic Movies showed it recently, and I had the opportunity to DVR and finally, to watch it.

Released in 1942, the fictional story relates the experiences of the villagers of Bramley End, as their quiet lives are changed by the arrival of several lorries full of Army Engineers, on a field exercise. Shortly, the behavior of some of the soldiers causes suspicion on the part of several of the women.



An NCO overreacts to the prying of a village lad​

Eventually, the CO of the orders the villagers collected into the church, where he announces that he and his men are German parachutists. Anyone who hesitates to obey, or attempts to escape, will be shot. As will their family.



After several villagers die, some while resisting with what is at hand, the rest realize that they must fight.


They kill a number of the guards, and seize their weapons, then determine that they must seize the phone board, and call for help. Elsewhere, others take their own actions, not knowing that they are part of a larger fight.






There is surprising violence and brutality for a film of this time. It portrays ordinary individuals who must do things they never would have imagined. From the local constable to the village poacher, the postmistress, a village fellow on leave from the Navy, even a young boy, all fight in their own way, to stop the invaders. It honestly portrays the disparity between common folk holding barricaded buildings, and the trained, ruthless, disciplined paratroopers they battle against.

Based on a story by Graham Greene, this film precedes both the book and film "The Eagle Has Landed" (which shares some plot devices and points) by 33 years. The first (and by far, the best) "Red Dawn" came 42 years later.
I recommend watching "Went the Day Well", if the opportunity presents itself. It is a fine film.

------
 

·
DO NOT READ THIS SENTENCE
Joined
·
2,235 Posts
A brilliant yet overlooked classic
 

·
The Mighty Boosh
Joined
·
8,425 Posts
Thanks, Mike. I'm embarrassed to say that I've never seen this film, even though I've known about it for many years.

I'll definitely track it down now.
 

·
wave man TDY staff
Joined
·
41,776 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm glad to have been able to pass this along, and owe it to actor Glenn Taranto. He acted on the advice of Leonard Maltin, and saw it at the 2011 TCM Film Festival. So taken by it, he chose it when he appeared with Robert Osborne, as a guest programmer on TCM. As it turns out, Amazon actually has the DVD.

Here is the verse from which the film's title derives:

Went the day well?
We died and never knew.
But, well or ill,
Freedom, we died for you.


- John Maxwell Edmonds, 1918

-----
 

·
Say what?
Joined
·
9,400 Posts
Thank you for the recommendation.

I'll seek it out as it sounds right up my alley, so to speak.
 

·
Web Research Junkie
Joined
·
1,598 Posts
Got this downloaded and I hope to watch it this weekend
 

·
wave man TDY staff
Joined
·
41,776 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Another chance, so heads up, if you have Turner Classic Movies, it will be on, 0200 ET, Saturday 11 September.
 

·
1:6 Acquisitionist
Joined
·
12,822 Posts
I just finished viewing this today.

An entertaining and fine period film.

Makes me wonder if a remake with a modern twist would fare well nowadays.

A rural small town in Texas on the border with Mexico is suddenly visited by a contingent of US Army troops undertaking a Homeland Security training exercise when in fact they're really ISIS infiltrators setting the stage for a terrorist attack by taking advantage of the porous border situation and the stereotypical attitudes and relaxed guard of the local town folks and the ineptitude of the local, state, and Federal government who never realized that such a situation would actually occur.

HMMM . . .
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top