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Apologies for the LONG delay in getting back to this issue…
http://www.onesixthwarriors.com/forum/showthread.php?t=63382&highlight=gladiator
:sadshake

The subligaculum
Here is the update I promised on the large garment which I believe is MEANT to be a "large" and ornate subligaculum.
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As you should be able to see this thing hangs VERY loosely around the waist of poor Thiumpius (a DML figure). It hangs WAY too low, and requires some sort of belt or other "intervention" to keep it up high over the waist as the garment needs to be worn…………………………….
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Vibonius shows us here how this is not really a scale subligaculum, but a rather simple "slip on" sort of "skirt," as I commented earlier.
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It consists of two "V" shaped pieces of red clothe, sewn at the hips and with an elastic waistband with a gold-ish sort of fringe at the lower "hem." Use it if you wish, but know that it is NOT the proper garment, just a cheap "phasmid."
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Normal gladiatorial wear was the subligaculum, the Mediterranean-area loin-cloth made of white material, probably linen, but also possibly soft light wool. Gladiators are asserted by some experts to have appeared in the arenas wearing subligacula of considerable variety in colors and ornamentation. But given the nature of some of this "variation" (as for example in the McBride illustrations), I question if the term subligaculum isn't being made to cover (pun intended) a wide variety of "sins." In ANY event what Vibonius holds is in no way a scale representation of the garment that Wisdom describes in his text [Osprey volume Gladiators, 100 BC-AD 200 (Warrior #39)].
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So, I took certain liberties in how I constructed the garment and tried to approach a more reliable reconstruction of McBride's representations…
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This last piece, with the wide leather belt with three metal ornaments from the figure's box, appears to "me" at least as a more "accurate" portrayal, always assuming McBride has interpreted the monumental evidence in a convincing way.
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This was the best I could do with the materials at hand. Thus I had to substitute some black-&-gold cord for the fringe, and I had to make do with only a few "dangling things" to represent the bells he was supposed to have had in McBride's recreation.

:nerd
 
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