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I want to create an underwater scene like this, but in 1/6 scale ( 6" W x 12" L x 14" H):



I can only think of two options:
1. clear casting resin (I'm guessing it would be too expensive and probably require tons of small layers)
2. water (Probably fill up a tank with water and fix everything in. Would be a problem if I want to have anything above the top surface, like a pier or boat).

Your suggestions are appreciated!

PS: It would be a Friday the 13th diorama.
 

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Possibly a 10 gallon fish tank, with like a board of some kind (wood or poster) at the top of it (cut to the shape you would need around the fish tank) with the pier attached to it. Then build your backdrop on the back of the board and on the outer side of the fish tank. Not the best way to do it but it's a basic idea.
 

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You could use the simulated gel water used in Floral displays. The kind I have is called Craft water. You use microwave or use the stove to heat it, pour into your display and then let it cure.

Mine is by miraclecoatings.com but I'm sure there are other brands out there.

:goodluck
 

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Hallo!

IMHO...

It depends upon "scale" meaning actual size, weight, or bulk. And, maybe whether a temporary or totally permanent set up.

I believe real water is the easiest and most cost effective. You could build a "tank," or perhaps look at the miniature fish tanks pet stores sell for desk tops.

For the surface of water, you could use a piece of polished clear plastic or even glass, "glossed" up and made wet looking with clear gloss paint. Or a thin layer of casting resin to hold your items firm. Glass, plastic, and gloss paint can add up to some intresting effects if you ply with refractions and reflections.

IF it were not depth AND surface, and just "depth" you can simulate water visually at the viewers front with a glass or plastic panel of sorts.... visually kind of like the visual FX created for the underwater shots in "The Hunt For Red October."
Or the way some movies and TV shows superimpose an aquarium shot over the film so that a dry actor or set looks "underwater" complete with bubbles and even a fish or sea weed or three.

:) :)
 

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There are some great suggestions here..what I would do is something very similar to what Kurt suggested but I would make a paneled box.

Kind of like this...



I would use clear acrylic plastic sheet, cut to your size, then another sheet inside maybe 1 cm deep and then pour clear resin into that, or better yet

Just use the clear acrylic sheet, make a box and then paint a wash of the clear resin to the inside to get the water effect..I think both would work..

Let us know how you make out:goodluck
 

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There are some great suggestions here..what I would do is something very similar to what Kurt suggested but I would make a paneled box.

Kind of like this...



I would use clear acrylic plastic sheet, cut to your size, then another sheet inside maybe 1 cm deep and then pour clear resin into that, or better yet

Just use the clear acrylic sheet, make a box and then paint a wash of the clear resin to the inside to get the water effect..I think both would work..

Let us know how you make out:goodluck
:agree This. If for no other reason this should be more cost effective, and if you'd like to remove the figures later, you won't have gel or resin everywhere. Remember it's not the water you want, but the effect of water.
 

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The box is a good idea but why not just use tinted plexiglass to build it? There's no need for a gel layer. You could also add printed acetate sheets (would have to be laser printed not ink jet) to the inside front and sides, and printed paper for the back.
 

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The box is a good idea but why not just use tinted plexiglass to build it? There's no need for a gel layer. You could also add printed acetate sheets (would have to be laser printed not ink jet) to the inside front and sides, and printed paper for the back.
Because you need that slight viscosity that gel gives, simulating water with microscopic air bubbles for example. Sure, really good painters could probably make it look convincing - but most of us aren't that.
 

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I've seen things like the below glass being used in stylish office lobby partitions, etc. You might be able to find something like it at 12" X 12" (I doubt any decor place sells larger sizes than that, unless it was a special manufacture order and much more expensive). You could support it by a 2" framing strip at the bottom in order to get the inner diorama up to 14", and I guess you'd have the wavy glass on three sides.

Looking through wavy "imperfect" glass is a very "watery" effect quite simply achieved. Just another possible option out there.

http://ogtstore.com/architectural-antiques/building-elements/wavy-glass-blocks-green-tint.html

http://glasswithapast.com/varieties-of-window-glass/
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