One Sixth Warriors Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to custom figure bashing, and I am working on a project that has me seeking some suggestions.

The figure is based on a movie character, so there are very specific reference materials available. During the course of the movie, the character progresses from clean and properly dressed to weathered and scruffy looking, losing some costume pieces along the way. Either look would be amazing if properly pulled off, but in my planning I was going to attempt to make both versions in one figure. Now, I am realizing that may be a bad idea.

The less weathered version would be easier, but it might look more "toyish" because of how new all the clothes would look. The weathered look is less iconic than the clean look because of the missing costume pieces, but still pretty cool. Since I don't really need two figures, I think I am going to have to choose one look over the other. There really is no middle ground without straying from screen accurate.

So, how do you choose to edit your figure bashing projects? Are you a weathering junkie, choosing the dirtiest look over all others? Or are you a screen accurate obsessive, requiring everything to look just as it did in the movie? Should I choose bits and pieces of both looks so that the figure is weathered and still has all the little costume pieces even though that means it won't be screen accurate?
 

·
BioChem Division
Joined
·
1,207 Posts
i dont know which character you are referring to, but it is definitely possible to "weather" a new looking outfit without trashing it.

the key to this kind of weathering is to amplify the subtleties of the outfit rather than simply dirtying up, and at the same time maintaining a clean look. kinda hard to explain.

another way of avoiding the "toyish" look is by custom tailoring the fit of the clothes onto the body, also adding realistic wrinkling/ clothing folds where possible. depends on how much effort you want to put into the figure.

hope that helps.
 

·
Walk in Beauty
Joined
·
1,793 Posts
If your happy with the "toyish" look then thats fine, nobody's gonna knock ya!
but I think as you bash more and more you also push that creativity level another notch, weathering, repaints, weapon customizations and even sewing. At least thats how I approach bashing a figure. You gotta top the last thing you did!

I think the researching (movie characters) and finding the right pieces is part of the fun and excitement, even though the pieces are not 100% accurate Im happy with 95%

I understand about the character progressing, example Dillion from Predator, he starts of clean, (dressed) but as time goes on he has his shirt off, just in his vest. Since I have the Apollo creed figure Ive decided to make the shirtless version of him and take advantage of that beautiful AA body, all sweaty and...anyway you get the picture. If it wasnt for the AA muscle body I would of opted/edited myself for the "dressed version of dillion.

What ever road you take, your figure will tell you what to do, they speak to you, especially at night, when there's no-one home and your all alone in the dark...Buuuuhhhhaaaaaaaa!
 

·
Eagle Eye Joe
Joined
·
2,581 Posts
Hmmm, this is a good thread. I actually lean towards "just close to the real deal". Ex: I just finished my John Locke from Lost figure. He actually wears tan cargo pants in the show, I used the CIA cargo pants, he has a light colored backpack, but I used a black one, his shirt is loose, but I used a tight one, he has a modern hunting rifle, I used a nice KAR98, he has a 60 year old body, I used a Dragon body. The only things that are film accurate are the headsculpt, belt, knife, and Baretta. The hiking boots aren't even the same. The ultimate test is just asking my friends who they think he is. Everyone knew who it was so I was happy.
Obsessing too much over perfect accuracy has, at times, taken the fun out of making a fig up so I just get as close as I can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Obsessing too much over perfect accuracy has, at times, taken the fun out of making a fig up so I just get as close as I can.[/quote]

I personally cant agree more.. the moment this becomes too obsessive, is the moment this isnt fun anymore. while accuracy is great if you can do it.. I would rather have something I am proud of, than something that looks so accurate, that it looks mass produced. this hobby is all about fun.
 

·
Good Enough Never Is
Joined
·
712 Posts
I am a full on screen accurate customizer. To me there is no point in having something represent something I loved in a movie unless it looks like I pulled it right out of my TV screen. I came into this hobby from the model building and painting hobby, so I tend not to accept the toy look as well. A little added detail and a repaint are usually what I need to really like a figure.

Here's a good example:
http://www.onesixthwarriors.com/forum/showthread.php?t=81499
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Great responses so far!

I have been studying photographs of all the customs that have a refined but weathered look, trying to pick up some ideas. I am planning on working the folds, tailoring and drape of the figure's clothes for the final product. I think the main sticking point in my own mind has been "do I worry if it isn't completely screen accurate." I could see how eventually that could become tiresome, but since I am just starting out that is where most of my excitement is derived. How close can I get it to the real thing?!?!

Sorry to be so mysterious about the character. It is also part of the fun to keep it to myself until I can unveil the finished figure.
 

·
wave man TDY staff
Joined
·
41,776 Posts
I agree that this is a good thread. I feel like it's a case by case decision-making process. Some subjects will beg for more weathering and detail than others. When I look at the work others post, I enjoy all levels of detail. There's a pretty wide spectrum, including basing, articulation or fixing and hiding of joints, hair done in sculpt or "real", posing, hand-crafting and modification, attention to accuracy, and yes even plain old "I did this because I like how it looked".

Editing as you call it (and a pretty good term at that), can be over done and underdone. The longer this hobby thrives, the more it seems to improve and inspire.
 

·
Australian OSW member
Joined
·
3,295 Posts
I haven't yet finished anything worthy to show here, but I'll be going for "good enough". My Aussie SASR figures won't necessarily be totally accurate -their guns might be slightly different variants to the perfect ones, different muzzles, lack of patches and insignia, but as long as they look the part, then I'll be happy. Likewise my WIP bashes that are inspired by Jarhead and Blackhawk Down - as long as they look good enough to me, I'll be happy.

Just my 5 cents.
 

·
WWII Guy
Joined
·
1,418 Posts
This is really a personal thing. I was told by the "master" Boot25 that an over weathered figure looks.... well like a dirty action figure (paraphrasing)....

I tend to agree with his point of view, but most of the parts still need to be weathered. They just dont need to be dunked in mud. So I kinda prefer a figure while not clean but not overly weathered.

I have been privilaged to see some creations that are way more weathered than I'd do but still were superb in thier presentation, so I'd have to say that if the weathering is done correctly it will not matter how weathered the figure is.

Cya,
Hankster
 

·
ever wearing flipflops
Joined
·
10,477 Posts
Welcome to OSW:)

I would do the clean version. If you don't like the look of it, you can take it through the same process as it's 1/1 scale on-screen counterpart ( discarding costume elements and adding weathering details in 1/6 ) That way you could have a two in one so to speak. Especially for the purpose of posting pics - that would chronicle your figure's - as well as the source character counterpart's - transformation from clean and together to rumpled and disheveled. And dirty. Either way sounds like a great project in the making.

By the way, when it come to my own bashes I am always terrified at the prospect of weathering. I don't know if it's because I am too lazy, or too fearful that I will mess it up. It is one of those customizing aspects that really challenges me. But in the end it can add realism and that extra something special. A decent weathering job is great accompaniment, and can help to tell a story about the figure. Best of luck with your project - no doubt many of us are looking forward to seeing the results:)
 

·
AKA "ChiliDoug"
Joined
·
7,541 Posts
I'm a huge fan of weathering. It can be daunting to try at first, for fear of wrecking your hard work. But depending on the type of work the figure is representing, dirt can make the figure. For instance, a clean looking coal miner would not scream "reality" to me.

I love to weather figures. I don't even know if I'm entirely successful at it, but I sure like to do it.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top