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1:6 Acquisitionist
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See subject.

For those who served in a desert/hot climate environment . . .

With the BDU and all the gear you wore when engaged in the field whether it was an urban environment or otherwise . . . is it obvious to say by the end of the patrol or whatever "goal"/"mission" you undertook . . . you guys were literally soaked in sweat due to the temperature?

A odd question yes, but when we see news footage of servicemen & women deployed in the field . . . we don't see them profusely sweating, etc. in hot temperatures in places like Afghanistan & Iraq . . . unless even with the temperature they're wearing some clothing that allows them to remain dry under such temperature challenging environments?
 

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It's because it's so dry, it dries as fast as you sweat. Now under the vest or plate carrier, or under your helmet is a different story. But once you take it off, you're only wet for a few minutes at most. But yes, in those areas that don't have good air flow, you are drenched.
 

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Agree with Matthew2388. Under the vest and helmet you were drenched rest of you stayed pretty dry. Best way I can describe the heat is get your house to about 70 degrees, now turn you oven on and preheat to 150-200 degrees. Sit in the floor in front of the oven door. Now carefully open the door fully and let the air rush out at you. That is Iraq on a typical breezy day.
 

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Devils and Dust
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What Mat and Nick say. I've been so drenched, my feet were squishing in my boots from all the sweat that rolled down the body and collected in the boot. Like I had been soaking them in a pail of water.
 

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Agree with Matthew2388. Under the vest and helmet you were drenched rest of you stayed pretty dry. Best way I can describe the heat is get your house to about 70 degrees, now turn you oven on and preheat to 150-200 degrees. Sit in the floor in front of the oven door. Now carefully open the door fully and let the air rush out at you. That is Iraq on a typical breezy day.
You forgot the hot air blow dryer for those desert winds in the summer.
 

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You forgot the hot air blow dryer for those desert winds in the summer.
Yeah you can use that analogy as well. Reminds me of a picture I took of 2 thermometers while in Iraq. They are 20 feet apart one sitting in the shade reads 120 degrees the other in the sun reads over 140 degrees.
 

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In Iraq when I walked and looked at my boots I could see water/sweat seeping out as I walked. Like others have said it dries fast on areas exposed to the dry heat, but this also leaves salt stains behind. Nice white salty stains.
 

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In Iraq when I walked and looked at my boots I could see water/sweat seeping out as I walked. Like others have said it dries fast on areas exposed to the dry heat, but this also leaves salt stains behind. Nice white salty stains.
Haha, so much so that my cammies could stand up on their own.
 
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