One Sixth Warriors Forum banner
1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone had experience with people just being jerks while trying to sell on EBay, or is it just me?

My situation: I'm selling a few figures on there. I've done my research and have tried to offer fair prices for various Soldier Story, Dam, etc. figures.

I have had some really bizarre behavior with the "best offer" feature where it just seems like people are purposely trying to annoy you. I'm making up numbers here to protect the innocent, but I just the following situation:

I am selling a figure for say $200, or best offer. Someone puts in an offer at $120. I counter at $160. They then counter at $125.

I think to myself, nah, I will just outright decline the offer with a note saying sorry I can only go as low as $160.


Next thing I know the same person submits an offer for $50. That's right, they lowered their offer by $75. Okay ...

I really wanted to say "Seriously dude, don't be an a$$." but instead I just declined the offer with a "No thank you, have a nice day" note.

What's the point of that kind of behavior on the part of the buyer? Why be a jerk for no reason at all? It's not like I was trying to sell a figure a thousand other people are offering at much lower prices or with outrageous shipping costs. This person was just being difficult.

I don't get it. I guess this is more of a rant than a question, but still I'm curious if anyone else has had to deal with this kind of nonsense.
 

·
1:6 Acquisitionist
Joined
·
12,929 Posts
Yes.

eBay at one point had a major problem with scumbag sellers. The whole paradigm shifted to now the problem is with scumbag buyers. Sure. There are still scumbag sellers as well, but there are processes in place to rectify the majority of problems compared to a long time ago. Scumbag buyers are very problematic and costs money and time.

My recommendation is to ignore AND BLOCK them. They screw around with you? Don't bother to message them, etc.

Make a list of the @$$hole scumbag eBay user IDs, block them, and post/share them so we too can block them.

I too sell on eBay, but there are way too may scumbag @$$hole buyers willing to screw over sellers through the current process/system on eBay and eBay doesn't do a damn thing about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,946 Posts
I don't get it. I guess this is more of a rant than a question, but still I'm curious if anyone else has had to deal with this kind of nonsense.
Unfortunately there are some obnoxious buyers in our hobby and on ebay it can seem like there are more. The best offer feature tends to bring them out in droves, some of that due to the fact that there are guys that have multiple accounts there. There is a buyer block feature that you can use, although I'm not sure if it prevents more offers. They recently raised the number of best offers a buyer can send so not sure how the blocks work with respect to that now. As for why they behave like that, anonymity tends to bring that out.
 

·
God Bless America
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
Yes.

eBay at one point had a major problem with scumbag sellers. The whole paradigm shifted to now the problem is with scumbag buyers. Sure. There are still scumbag sellers as well, but there are processes in place to rectify the majority of problems compared to a long time ago. Scumbag buyers are very problematic and costs money and time.

My recommendation is to ignore AND BLOCK them. They screw around with you? Don't bother to message them, etc.

Make a list of the @$$hole scumbag eBay user IDs, block them, and post/share them so we too can block them.

I too sell on eBay, but there are way too may scumbag @$$hole buyers willing to screw over sellers through the current process/system on eBay and eBay doesn't do a damn thing about it.
:agree :thumb
EXACTLY right! Decline the joke offer and block those insultingly cheap bidders. You can also set the minimum offer you'll accept when you use the best offer option. It AUTOMATICALLY rejects low-ball offers.

I've had offers that were 10% of my price. Do they really think I'd take that? I block some of them. It's a sign of potential problems if they end up buying something.

And yes, please share the names and help other sellers avoid headaches. It's almost the only recourse sellers have.
Again, DFC, great idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
Yes.

eBay at one point had a major problem with scumbag sellers. The whole paradigm shifted to now the problem is with scumbag buyers. Sure. There are still scumbag sellers as well, but there are processes in place to rectify the majority of problems compared to a long time ago. Scumbag buyers are very problematic and costs money and time.

My recommendation is to ignore AND BLOCK them. They screw around with you? Don't bother to message them, etc.

Make a list of the @$$hole scumbag eBay user IDs, block them, and post/share them so we too can block them.

I too sell on eBay, but there are way too may scumbag @$$hole buyers willing to screw over sellers through the current process/system on eBay and eBay doesn't do a damn thing about it.
Has eBay ever attempted to balance things out between the buyer and seller dynamic or have they always been on one side or the other?
 

·
1:6 Acquisitionist
Joined
·
12,929 Posts
Has eBay ever attempted to balance things out between the buyer and seller dynamic or have they always been on one side or the other?
--

Back in the old days, eBay sided with sellers.

Nowadays, eBay sides with buyers and not necessarily so much with sellers.

I honestly can't say if there was ever a perfect balance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,752 Posts
I have yet to sell anything on eBay, mostly because of all the horror stories. But as a buyer I can tell you my personal preferences that may or may not help you as a seller.

I personally despise open bidding and refuse to do it. I get it, it's great for the seller, because you have the possibility to make a lot of money from an idiot stupid enough to continue bidding. But I've seen some where it's pretty obvious it's the seller bidding on their own product to jack up the price -- f$&k those people (I hope they die in a car fire).

I also avoid most Best Offer listings because it's pretty obvious most selllers do not want to sell it for any less than $3-4 less than list price. Then don't bother putting Or Best Offer.

I get a lot of stuff off eBay, and 99.999% of the time it's for a Buy Now item. If I really want/need the item I'll get if the price doesn't feel to over-inflated. If the price is absurd (like the guy who keeps listing Phicen HS for $89-100 or more; that's just ridiculous), I walk away and hope the item resurfaces or something better comes along.

So, I guess what I'm saying is. Put a price on an item, list as Buy Now, and wait. You avoid at least some of the BS from buyers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
711 Posts
I think a lot of people on ebay uses the best offer feature unrealistically, hoping to get a low ball deal on a product. Depending on the price of the item, I would go for a fair amount. For instance, if someone $100, I would go 93 or 95. That said, I tend to win the items.

However, I have noticed some sellers would put the lowest agreed price of a best offer for 50 dollar item, for example, by 49.90 for instance. As someone else had already said, what is the point for a seller of using a best offer if they only accept a few cents off? Not sure if this was the tni forums or the is a forums, but a poster years ago wrote the reason why some sellers use the best offer function is in hopes someone offers more than the asking price; he said that he knew someone who was so frustrated of people offering lower prices for an item rather than offering higher prices.
 

·
1:6 Miniature Craftsman
Joined
·
693 Posts
I've stopped using "Best Offer"; it causes more trouble than it is worth. If you don't get any takers at your original price then consider dropping it a little when you relist it. If you aren't in a hurry to sell then you can afford to simply let it stay up at its original price until you find someone willing to buy it. It might take months but eventually someone will be willing to pay what you want for it.
 

·
1:6 Acquisitionist
Joined
·
12,929 Posts
I never use best offers.

It's either an auction or a buy it now price.

That doesn't stop some @$$holes from sending you a message "demanding" you accept your offer or a payment arrangement.

Yes.

I received such messages. I replied "No." and blocked them.

I even had some @$$holes attempt to buy items from using buy it now, but they didn't meet my minimum criteria. I ended cancelling the transaction and refunding their payment and blocking them after I made sure I had their contact information, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,946 Posts
Has eBay ever attempted to balance things out between the buyer and seller dynamic or have they always been on one side or the other?
Ebay is always tweaking various things that effect the buyer/seller dynamic. A recent example of this was increasing the maximum number of times a buyer can make a best offer. Another recent change is beta testing forced immediate payment on groups of sellers regardless if the seller sets that in their listing. This was done under the rationale of helping sellers by ensuring buyers actually pay for goods as ebay has a problem with deadbeat buyers. Unfortunately it has had the opposite effect as it breaks the request total feature in the shopping cart which has left both buyers and sellers frustrated and confused.

In terms of resolving problems it is about as balanced as you can practically hope for given you need to have a third party arbitrate he said/she said disputes without much in the way of facts to go on. The caveat is that ebay outsources a lot of customer service either to third parties, or to algorithms. This can result in situations which can be unfair as either or a seller or a buyer. I have generally found that if you can get through (on the phone, they don't really do much in the way of email) to the right person, you are generally treated in a mostly fair manner. Getting through to someone who is actually knowledgeable about their policies and how they apply in all the various combinations of situations can be the difficult part. This applies equally as a buyer or seller. Sometimes you have to educate their staff, even supervisors. Buyers are better protected compared to the days when money orders were used to pay for goods on ebay. Buyers are generally given more rope these days and you can get away with a lot as a buyer as there is very rarely a violation where you can be banned for a single instance. A buyer can for example issue a death threat and still keep their account. In that sense the the dynamic is out of balance as sellers can be penalized in real terms more readily than a buyer. Overall there is too much of a reliance on algorithms, much like those that plague youtube. If you are willing to pick up a phone and donate 45 minutes of your life, your experience will be different than someone who gets hard done by an algorithm or an outsourced call center employee who has yet to be trained.

You also have to factor in how a retailer perceives the balance, and how a casual seller perceives the balance. A retailer will experience the same buyer issues regardless of the venue. Casual sellers are not used to the rules that apply to distance selling and how things are handled in chargeback disputes with your merchant account provider. The same ways buyers abuse ebay buyer protection, they abuse chargebacks. People still believe there is such a thing as selling and not accepting returns on ebay (or any other venue for that matter). There isn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Wow a lot of feedback! Very cool.

Look at the end of the day I don't mind haggling with someone, my point is simply just don't be a jerk about it. I guess it is the lack of face to face that emboldens people to make outrageous offers. I'm guess the same person who makes a $50 offer on a $200 item wouldn't have the stones to do that to your face or walk into a Porsche dealer say and offer to pay $35 grand for a $120k car. Keyboard courage I guess.
 

·
1:6 Acquisitionist
Joined
·
12,929 Posts
Wow a lot of feedback! Very cool.

Look at the end of the day I don't mind haggling with someone, my point is simply just don't be a jerk about it. I guess it is the lack of face to face that emboldens people to make outrageous offers. I'm guess the same person who makes a $50 offer on a $200 item wouldn't have the stones to do that to your face or walk into a Porsche dealer say and offer to pay $35 grand for a $120k car. Keyboard courage I guess.
--

The fact and reality is that there are those who'll be @$$holes about it regardless.

I'm we've all done the same thing and just too ashamed/embarrassed to ever admit it publicly here.
 

·
I've been Minimoyzed
Joined
·
14,081 Posts
Oh I have had that a few times. Very annoying.

If you have a Best Offer option on your listing, you have to expect the strange ones to come knocking. Some people do have the stones to not only ask for crazy low prices, they will actually badger you until you cave in in person. Easiest way to stop them on Ebay is to block them. Or use up the declines so they can no longer make crazy offers on your stuff. They get 3 tries, after that, they can just Buy It Now. If you get offended, block them and the problem goes away.

Maybe these folks have had luck making offers like that. Who knows. I had a guy do it on Kijiji too. I was selling a tool box for $200, marked way down from original price and in very good shape. He showed up and says I'll pay $60 for it and starts peeling off $20's. I asked when he would make up the difference, and he says "$60 is good enough, you'll take that". Will I now?.. Nope, sorry, the add is for $200. Nice talking with you, and get out of my yard. He tried haggling for almost 5 more minutes. That's actually a long time in person. He left without a tool box, and just about with a fat lip. I digress. People will do it in person too, so if it's just on Ebay, ignore them or block them, and they will go away soon enough.
 

·
1:6 enthusiast
Joined
·
2,052 Posts
Personally, I buy using Best Offer, BIN and Auction format. It's really simple if you go into it with a little common sense and always remember to look for the same items that may be available from other sellers for the same price or less. Additionally, a seller's feedback should always to be taken into account as well. I simply won't buy anything from a high volume seller with less than 99% positive feedback and will only consider dealing with a low volume seller with less than that if I can deduce from their feedback comments, that they dealt with a jerk that screwed their feedback up. On Best Offer listings, you can't realistically expect a seller to drop their price by more than 25-30%, so I bid accordingly. If a seller is offering an item for $60, then I'll usually offer $45 and nine times out of ten they will counter with $50. If they counter with anything less than 10% off, then I figure that they aren't serious about the Best Offer option and I move along. However, I've often skipped on making an offer and made the purchase using BIN when the price was very good to begin with. I figure, why jinx a great deal by getting greedy? As for auctions, it's best to never bid early, but if you do, only bid the maximum that you're willing to pay and skip the incremental bids that lead to a bidding war. And NEVER, EVER engage in bidding wars. Even if you win a bidding war, then you still lose because the only thing that you've proven, is the old adage, "a fool and his money are soon parted". As for jerk buyers, the advice already given has been sound. Block them and otherwise ignore them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
There are a lot of idiots in the world and unfortunately they can do more harm to more people on the net that anywhere else. Not much help I know, but I sympathize with you a lot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Interesting discussion. I buy and sell on eBay at a ratio of 90/10, so I take more of a buyer's perspective on things. I find the 'Make Offer' feature to be subjective and even regionally variable in what seller's expect to be 'normal offer behaviour'. The big volume sellers in China usually end up only moving 1-2% in the end whilst small scale sellers will usually move to 5-10% and sometimes up to 20% if it's been on the market for ages or is intentionally inflated to begin with in hopes of an impulse sale. Probably the max I've offered is a third off, and that's only due to a very long listing time and some damage. The seller took it. I'd never think to lowball for no legitimate reason.

For instance, I've been watching a HT item with a Japanese seller for about 8 months with about 10 other watchers. I bought it a couple days ago. I offered 15% less. He countered to 12% less, and I accepted. No drama and all very professional.

As someone else said, you can set the low offer threshold and give the buyer and automatic offer declination. You can filter low offers out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
...As for auctions, it's best to never bid early, but if you do, only bid the maximum that you're willing to pay and skip the incremental bids that lead to a bidding war. And NEVER, EVER engage in bidding wars. Even if you win a bidding war, then you still lose because the only thing that you've proven, is the old adage, "a fool and his money are soon parted"...
On auctions, I only use auto bidders set to the last few seconds. Early bidding also promotes scam seller shilling. I find even asking a question to the seller toward the end an auction is enough to cause suspect shill bids to appear. I don't even mark what I want to bid on as 'watch'. I save it as a link instead. Fly under the radar as much as possible.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top