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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Along time ago, I know I had a link somewhere on how to do scale conversion for 1/th

I'm horribel with math, so it helped quite a bit.

How do I go about converting 1-1 math into 1/6th scale.

Trying to figure out how to scratch build a door and can't quite figure out what the dimensions should be.

Thanks
Peter
 

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you know, i laugh a little every time this subject comes up. I guess they don't teach kids what fractions really are in school anymore, do they? 1/6 = 1 divided by 6.

Like hardcase says, take whatever the measurement in the real world is, and divide it by six. keep the units of measure the same (ie, if you take something 30 feet long and divide by 6, the answer is still in feet). Even better, convert all feet to inches, and divide by six... then your final answer is in inches.

unless you are doing metric... then just divide by six, and keep the same units of measure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It was taught to me in school, but that was 30+ years ago.

I can only remember so much good and semi-useless info.

Thanks for all the help

Peter
 

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Yeah, as a result of getting into 1/6th scale hobby I have some to love the metric system. I refer my 1:1 measurements to be done in centimeters or such and then do the divide by 6. Easier and more accurate than trying to do it using English system of Feet and inches. But if you must use English system, convert your Feet and inches to just inches, makes the division easier (6' 6" = 78" which = 13" in 1/6th).
 

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Mandoll withdrawl
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I'd imagine you would have to multiply by the 1/xx scale's denominator to get the 1:1, then divide by 6 to get the 1/6.
 

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Most important of all, is that the formula only works at sea level. For every thousand feet of elevation, one degree Fahrenheit must be added to the equation.
 

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laughinggravy2 said:
Most important of all, is that the formula only works at sea level. For every thousand feet of elevation, one degree Fahrenheit must be added to the equation.
hahhaha :rolling
 

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Good Duck said:
But.....what if I want to convert......1/16 or 1/15 into 1/6? Or 1/35/or 1/48 into 1/6?
Are you serious?
 

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A conversion factor can be established by multiplying the intended scale by the reciprocal of the initial scale.

e.g.

1/6 to 1/16 would be something like this:

x is the conversion factor

1/6x=1/16
X=(1/16)*(6/1)
X=6/16
X=3/8

So, a 12” figure being 1/6th scale, multiplied by the conversion factor of 3/8:

12*3/8=4.5

Common scales which I deal with would have the following pattern:

1:6 to 1:18 - 1/3
1:6 to 1:32 – 3/16
1:18 to 1:32 – 9/16

I've had pretty good luck with this system.
 

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I have done scale conversions before, and its pretty easy.. I just keep a ruler (with various types of measurements) and a calculator nearby. I drew up plans for a 1:350th USS Enterprise recently, using measurements from the 1:1000th version.

Basically, you measure, multiply by 1000, then divide by 350 (for the 1:350th measurements being converted from 1:1000)

So, for example, if you wanted to make a sixth scale world war two fighter and base it on a 1:72nd model, you would take measurements from the model, multiply by 72 (to get the real-world measurements) and then divide THAT number by six.
 

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For a change of pace, you can multiply 1/1 dimensions by 0.16666
 

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So, for example, if you wanted to make a sixth scale world war two fighter and base it on a 1:72nd model, you would take measurements from the model, multiply by 72 (to get the real-world measurements) and then divide THAT number by six.
only if they modeled it correctly in scale to begin with.

if you base your calculations on an already scaled model, your 1:6 version will be as equally off-scale as the model potentially is. but if the 1:72 model is accurate, then you have no problem.

i guess the only way to know this is to find out the measurements in 1:1 then divide by 72, but if you have the measurements in 1:1 on hand then you dont even need to bother with the model to begin with.
 

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Good point AP. I was thinking about that late last night as I lingered over the M113 thread and the concerns over the vehicle to model's slight underscaling.

For modern vehicles used by the US Military, fas.org has a lot of good measurements and diagrams for this, as would I imagine the manufacturers themselves.

Then there is wikipedia and of course our knowledgeable peers on the forums who engross themselves in so many eras.

I will now withdraw from this thread as the plethora of numberage is making me feel inept.

Btw, good luck and have fun making your dio pdginwis. Look forward to seeing it. :D
 
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