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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Companeros,
I hope you enjoy this figure. I originally had planned something simple, but the historian in me would not allow it. The first pics show Guynemer in his flight suit (a pain to "bulk up") the second set, he is weearing the Air Corps officer Uniform.Hope you like it.

Capt. Guynemer,1917
THE FIGURE:
- The base sculpt was repainted and a 'stash added to it.
- The uniform is a dyed and HEAVILLY modified 21st century German uniform, the belt is DML/leather attachments
- medals and insignia are hand made, printed on heavy card
- The jacket is DML
- goggles, boots, and flight cap are hasbro
- The kepi is hand made (a BIG pain)
- The base is custom as well as the SPAD XII fuselage.

HISTORY:
Georges Marie Ludovic Jules Guynemer (1894-1917) was one of France's highest scoring fighter pilots during WWWI..
Born on 24 December 1894 in Paris, Guynemer was born to a wealthy family and experienced an often sickly childhood, he was originally rejected for military service at the start of the war, but was accepted for training as a mechanic in late 1914.
With determination, he gained acceptance to pilot training, and upon joining the elite Escadrille N.3 in 1916, Guynemer quickly established himself as one of France's premier fighter pilots. He became an ace by his fifth victory in February 1916, and was promoted to lieutenant in March. At the year's end, his score had risen to 25. Capitaine Brocard, then commander of Escadrille N.3, described Guynemer as "...my most brilliant Stork." Less than a year later, Guynemer was promoted to captain and commander of the Storks squadron.



As a self-described 'Boche hunter' on 8 February 1917, Guynemer became the first Allied pilot to shoot down a German Gotha bomber. His greatest month was May 1917, when he downed seven German aircraft. He became the first French ace to attain 50 victories at the end of July. Guynemer was lionized by the French press and became a national hero. The French government encouraged the publicity to boost morale and take the people's minds off the terrible losses in the trenches. Guynemer was embarrassed by the attention, but his shyness only increased the public's appetite to know everything about him.
On the morning of September 11, 1917 Gueynemer began his final combat mission. He was last seen attacking a German observation plane in his Spad XIII S.504 n°2, "Vieux Charles." Although the Germans announced that he had been shot down by Lt. Kurt Wissemann of Jasta 3, neither the wreckage of his airplane, his body, nor his personal effects were ever found.

Guynemer's death was a profound shock to France; nevertheless, he remained an icon for the duration of the war. Only 22 at his death, he continued to inspire the nation with his advice, "Until one has given all, one has given nothing."French schoolchildren of the time were taught that Guynemer had flown so high he couldn't come back down again.
At the time of his death he had achieved 53 victories, was shot down seven times and survived over approximately 600 combat missions, was awarded the Medaille Militaire, Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur ,Officier de la Legion d'Honneur, and over 23 citations.



Guynemer's inscription in the Panthéon in Paris reads:
"Dead on the field of honor, September 11, 1917. A legendary hero fallen in glory from the sky after three years of hard and incessant struggle, he will remain the purest symbol of national ideals for his indomitable tenacity of purpose, his ferocious verve and sublime gallantry. Animated by an invincible faith in victory, he has bequeathed to the French soldier an imperishable heritage which consecrates the spirit of sacrifice and will surely inspire the noblest emulation."

Online Sources : www.first world war.com, www.acepilots.com,
www.wwimodeler.com,and www.wikipedia.com













saludos

siquisiri
 

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Annaberg
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Faire Face

"Tant qu'on n'a pas tout donné, on n'a rien donné"
"Until one has given all, one has given nothing"
Guynemer's advice
 

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"Load clear!"
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206 Posts
Having an interest in aviation, that one hits home. The fuselage pannel in the back is a nice touch! Excellent work!
 

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OSW Pug Warrior
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5,658 Posts
Great work & tribute, siquisiri :thumb :thumb
I just saw the episode "The First Dogfighters", part of the Dogfighters Season 2 series, where Ernst Udet survived his encounter with Mssr. Guynemer because of the man's chivalry and sense of fairness. An incredible French ace.
 

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Intercept,Engage,Destroy
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Great work & tribute, siquisiri :thumb :thumb
I just saw the episode "The First Dogfighters", part of the Dogfighters Season 2 series, where Ernst Udet survived his encounter with Mssr. Guynemer because of the man's chivalry and sense of fairness. An incredible French ace.
I'm AV8TORJoe...and I fully endorse this ad! :thumb

Seriously, GREAT JOB on Guynemer....siquisiri! :thumb
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Companeros,
Thanks for the comments. I just watched the same dogfighters episode a few days ago. I have always found Its amazing when you read stories about this type of chivalry during WWI. After watching the episode, I was thinking that I might put together a Werner Voss in the future.

saludos
siquisiri
 
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