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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The latest in a series of commissions of British soldiers from the late Victorian era is an officer from the Lancashire Fusiliers as he would have appeared during the Boer War. My customer requested the full Sam Browne rig out so a bit of research was needed. With all my Boer War figures, Pierre Turner's book on British equipment has been invaluable but for the Sam Browne equipment, I had to delve further into various Osprey titles and websites.

The equipment takes its name from General Sir Samuel James Browne VC GCB KCSI (3 October 1824 - 14 March 1901), who was a British Indian Army cavalry officer in India and the Near East. Browne won the Victoria Cross on 31 August 1858 at Seerporah, India. In an engagement with the rebels, Captain Browne, whilst advancing upon the enemy's position, pushed on with one orderly sowar upon a 9-pounder gun and attacked the gunners, preventing them from re-loading and attacking the infantry who were advancing to the attack. In the conflict which ensued, Captain Browne received two sword cuts, one on the left knee and one which severed his left arm at the shoulder, but not before he had cut down one of his assailants. The gun was eventually captured and the gunner killed.

Sometime after this incident he began to wear the accoutrement which bears his name, as compensation for the difficulty his disability caused with wearing his officer's sword. Later the wearing of the Sam Browne belt would be adopted by other officers who knew Browne in India, but it was not to come into common use in the British Army until after his retirement. Browne's original belt is now on public display in the India Room of the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst. (Wikipedia)



The equipment consists of a belt and two braces which crossover at the back. The set can be worn with one brace. From the belt, the sword is slung. The sword sits balanced, close to the body rather than hanging behind the left leg as with previous hanger arrangements. In later years, when the sword was abandoned while on active service, a haversack was slung from the same belt loops.



A pistol/holster and cartridge pouch complete the basic set.
All the leather equipment here has been scratchbuilt. The belt buckle came from the DiD John Coleman set.



His equipment is completed by the addition of a set of modified Sideshow binoculars and case, a scratchbuilt waterbottle, haversack and rolled greatcoat in a sling. His Foreign Service helmet is one of Tony Barton's excellent creations. I've given it a khaki paintjob, added a pugree, chinstrap and a Lancashire Fusiliers helmet flash.



His uniform is hand tailored with Battlegear Toys buttons. The puttees are hem tape and his boots are Sideshow WW1. In this shot, he's wearing Tony's Wolseley helmet which would have been issued later in the war.



The crowning glory in this figure is the sword and hilt which Tony made for me. I'm so grateful for his assistance as I wouldn't have known where to start.



The pistol is the Sideshow WW1 Webley which comes with the Lewis Gunner. I've modified the handle to make it resemble the 1892 model.
The sword scabbard is made from two pieces of plasticard. Each piece is routed out until it's nearly paper thin but deep enough to take the sword blade. It's been covered with leather as was the practice for active service.



I made his rolled greatcoat from old t-shirt material.



His binoculars have had a bit of weathering.



I added a few extra items to this figures personal effects. These include a toothbrush, cutthroat razor, field notebook, pocketwatch as well as the cutlery, shaving mirror and brush, boot polish etc. Surprisingly, it all fits in his haversack!


"God Save the Queen"

Hope you like it folks. All comments are welcome.

Andy
 

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Andy 'Tony Barton Junior'!

Andy, your work just gets better and better - when I saw the Boer War Drummer I thought figures don't get any better than this.

But then your Black Watch Sergeant came along, and I was amazed that you'd trumped the Drummer - and now this!

The leatherwork is stunning work, and how do you rout out plasticard that finely?

I'm speechless about the whole thing. I refuse to believe you can get any better than this - but knowing you you'll prove me wrong!
 

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Wow! The work on the leather is amazing. This figure is a true work of art. You have always had such a great eye for how a figure wears his clothing if you know what I mean. He looks perfect.
:clap
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all the kind comments folks. It was a nice change to work on an officer and to produce brown equipment as opposed to all the Slade/Wallace white leather from most of the previous figures.
David; How do you rout out plasticard? Veeeeeery carefully!:)

Cheers folks
Andy
 
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