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Loser 6
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The story of the 34th Infantry Division and Hill 609 has interested me ever since I first read of it. I tried my hand at portraying this in 2013, and while successful I knew I could do better. This is my attempt here. I put more effort into utilizing the earlier war U.S. gear that would have been seen.


Two men from F company, 135th Infantry regiment of the 34th rush to take Hill 461


Modern day photo of the area, Hill 609 looms in the background. Hill 461 had to be taken by the 2nd Battalion, 135th Infantry, 34th Infantry Division to secure the division's left flank. This photo serves to show how rough the terrain was and how exposed an infantryman could be.


PFC Stanley Brighton, my BAR man. Portraying one of the original members of the 135th infantry, he hails from Owatonna, Minnesota. His helmet shows he is wearing an old Hawley helmet liner, one of the first to be made for the M1 helmet. The Hawley liner was commonly seen during the early war period, here in North Africa and in the Pacific.


He is wearing the rough out boots that were just coming into service.


I used Tony Barton's head sculpt, number 72 for my character Stanley Brighton.


Rifleman, Private Ralph Acheson, a recent replacement to the 135th. Originally from Ft. Wayne, Indiana. He has been with the unit for a short while and saw the fighting at Fonduk, just prior to this fight. His job is to support the BAR, he carries additional BAR magazines seen in the bandolier worn on his chest.


One interesting side note to this battle- hundreds of 34th Infantry men had been accidently overdosed by the new anti-Malarial drug Atabrine. The 34th Infantry Division medics apparently had no instructions on the dosage to prescribe to the men and therefore went heavy handed in administering it. The effects were widespread vomiting and diarrhea. If you look carefully on PVT Acheson's uniform you will see my weathering to capture his vomiting on himself. I didn't do this for the "gross-out" factor, but to capture something that happened during that period. Despite being basically poisoned, these men fought- and WON!!


I used Tony Barton's head sculpt number 18 for my character PVT Ralph Acheson.


BAR team engaging the enemy

In 2015 my wife gave me the "Liberation Trilogy" written by Rick Atkinson. His book from this set, "An Army at Dawn" is a fascinating read and inspired me to re-look my effort into this little dio. The details from this book and a couple others brought this to life and inspired me to tell this little story in America's advent into WWII.

I went through a lot of effort to ensure this was accurate, from details on the helmet liners down to the right color boot laces.

Thanks for looking............Jim
 

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I'm BACK!!
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21,878 Posts
These two are superb and it's great to see that you've really put some though into their weathering.

Nice job

CHEERS!
 

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I remember the original figures, but these are welcome upgrades. Great work with a lot of character in both figures. I especially like the ammunition bearer. The wood on the BAR is great and I love the way you weather helmets. Excellent work!

I forgot to mention that the care taken to make the helmet liner distinct is just too cool. That's the kind of stuff I like, when you can inventory and justify every piece of kit on a figure. It's those little details that really bring out the historical aspect of the hobby--that you can't just replicate with out-of-the-box figures.
 

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i draw pictures.....
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2,045 Posts
wow. Truly awesome and beautiful detailing on both figures. I absolutely love your Gis and strive to reach that level of detail in mine one day.The backstory of this two is fantastic as well. always a joy to see your posts.

namaste
miguel
 

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volunteercontentprovider
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Very nice work!! Love the attention to detail and the weathering - just great!!
 

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wave man TDY staff
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Your figures present both admirable work and believable characters, along with a very enjoyable historical background. In addition to the sickness brought on by the over-medication, these men from the middle of America found themselves in an arid climate and hard-scrabble terrain, very different from what they knew. The Great Depression had left many of them lean, but tough. In pictures, they often look older than they were. The Germans gave them a bloody welcome in North Africa, but GIs learned fast.

A beautiful tribute to these men, Jim.
 

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AKA "ChiliDoug"
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Your weathering and realistic details are the best in the hobby.

What bodies did you use, jim? They are wonderfully proportioned.
 

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WWII Guy
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1,418 Posts
Jim

love to see your posts! always put together spot on! The weathering is always just enough as well.
Superb Work!

Cya,
Hankster
 

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Another great example of what can be achieved in our hobby with skill, patience and study.
I also notice Jim you have chosen here to let the figures unfrozen and free to be posed conforming to the situation and this is my present philosophy regarding the 1/6 figures. I have nothing against the multipose approach and in fact I built hundreds of 1/35 figures and some dioramas but I'm now caught by the freedom given by the truer to life details and as such they should remain free to change and transform...
Kudos!
 

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Pure happiness every time, a fantastic work and very realistic, what you happen to do is just happiness for the eyes and also always linked to a story, thanks to you,

CV
 

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Loser 6
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618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Another great example of what can be achieved in our hobby with skill, patience and study.
I also notice Jim you have chosen here to let the figures unfrozen and free to be posed conforming to the situation and this is my present philosophy regarding the 1/6 figures. I have nothing against the multipose approach and in fact I built hundreds of 1/35 figures and some dioramas but I'm now caught by the freedom given by the truer to life details and as such they should remain free to change and transform...
Kudos!
Thank you, I prefer to have my figures poseable for the reasons you stated, posing them in various situations allows me to get more out of the figure and help tell their "story".....Jim
 

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Loser 6
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Your figures present both admirable work and believable characters, along with a very enjoyable historical background. In addition to the sickness brought on by the over-medication, these men from the middle of America found themselves in an arid climate and hard-scrabble terrain, very different from what they knew. The Great Depression had left many of them lean, but tough. In pictures, they often look older than they were. The Germans gave them a bloody welcome in North Africa, but GIs learned fast.

A beautiful tribute to these men, Jim.
PD, thank you, that was my intent, to honor the men that were there. We are losing our WWII vets at an incredible rate, the numbers vary from source to source. It is my humble hope to let them know that I appreciate their efforts and sacrifices in my own way.....Thanks for the compliment.
 

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Mik the Brit
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759 Posts
Soon as I saw these I noted they were Tony's headsculpts, you certainly did them justice, details are amazing, love these. Well done.
 
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