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Seems I was one of the lucky ones in dealing with the infamous Sovereign Studios. I purchased his (or her?) custom Arkham Asylum Batman a couple years back off of eBay and, in terms of quality, it's still the best custom figure I've ever even seen, let alone owned (photo attached). In fact, the only gripe I have about the figure as a display piece is that the head was made to be stationary. Could anybody give me a few pointers as to how I might go about articulating the head? It seems to be a hollow rubber cast, but I would love to be able to modify it so that I can socket mount it. Problem is, I don't know the body type that Sovereign Studios used, and I don't want to mess up the fitted rubber cast armor to find out. I was thinking I could just cut and fit the rubber cast head over a generic solid head (neck painted to match the cowl) to give him the appearance of having a somewhat movable head. Would that even work? Any advice would be appreciated before I start cutting...
 

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Funk Ninja
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3,649 Posts
Hey Lendell,
You could try using a ball and socket joint. You can get in touch with the Castle Brimstone folks through Facebook and order a couple.
Here's a link to them being used to articulate a head on a Dragon figure: http://blog.castlebrimstone.com/?p=520

Are you able to strip down Bats a bit, to help see what kind of head configuration he uses?
 

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Jawa
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1,593 Posts
That's going to be a tough job. How is the head/cowl attached to the body? Can you tell if it is glued on or is it attached to a peg or a post or something? I think you will need to remove the head/cowl from the body and then work from there. The problem is, you run the risk of ruining the custom figure (for example, if the head is glued onto the body, the cloth undersuit could rip when removing the head).

If you are able to remove the head, it really depends on what kind of neck post is there. If it is a Dragon style neck post, you can probably attach the male end of a Lego Bionicle joint to the neck stub, then insert the female Bionicle joint into the head itself. You can attach the joints in place using Magic Sculpt (or other 2-part epoxy putty). You should have a significant range of motion. One area to watch out: if you do not line up/recess the Bionicle joints perfectly onto the neck and inside the head, he will have the dreaded "giraffe neck." You will also have to repaint the puttied areas on the neck and around the head to match the rest of the figure.

Overall, unless you are very sure in your abilities, I wouldn't mess with it. I know I would not be able to do it without making a huge mess of the figure. The figure looks pretty awesome as it is now.

EDIT Pickle Munkey beat me to it. That tutorial is exactly what I was attempting (poorly) to explain, except I use Lego Bionicle joints since they are readily available and cheap.
 

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Riverboat engineman
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2,219 Posts
A few years ago, at a weekend of Hero there was a gentleman who had a RC jeep.
In it he had a figure who he could make the head turn by RC.
He did it some how, I do not think it would be hard to do. Maybe using flight controls used in RC airplanes (areons and flap control?)
 

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A few years ago, at a weekend of Hero there was a gentleman who had a RC jeep.
In it he had a figure who he could make the head turn by RC.
He did it some how, I do not think it would be hard to do. Maybe using flight controls used in RC airplanes (areons and flap control?)
An articulation head in an RC adds awesome detail. Here's mine:





In action


In the vehicle

 
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