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AKA "ChiliDoug"
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

One of my pet peeves in the 1/6th universe is visible joints for my figures. Some people don't care, but I can't stand (for my figures) to show those joints if they are wearing shorts or short sleeved shirts. Anyway, to my knowledge, Liquid Latex has been talked about as a possible "fix' but I haven't seen any results on this board.

I got some "Ben Nye's" liquid latex at a year round costume shop yesterday. It comes in a few colors and I got the flesh colored one. My first attempt is on the heavy-set guys right arm. It hasn't been painted yet to match the hand, but you get the idea. It was easy to use and if there is interest, I'll whip up a quick tutorial. The left arm is bare for reference. The latex is flexible, so his arm bends. But it's a rubber covering and does bunch a bit. The best bet would be to mold it into the shape you want.

Also for this figure is a custom "fat" suit. I bought a fat suit from a member on this board and it is very good. But it should be called a "slightly overweight suit" rather than a fat suit. So I made my own. Also, the one I bought made his waist and legs fat, so nothing but stretch pants would fit this guy and that just won't do.

So here is the beginnings of my fat detective, a kind of homage to "Cannon," the best fat detective that ever was.

 

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Français par le sang vers
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798 Posts
That right arm looks so natural... i think you don't even need to paint it at all.. :thumb
 

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AKA "ChiliDoug"
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7,541 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Always wanted to do something like this, but my main concern is can the joints still articulate? Thanx! ;)
yes they still can, but it ends up being kind of like Hot Toys Deunan's rubber suit. It bends easily, but does bunch a bit. But then there is a crease when the human body bends at the elbow too and the back of the knee...

Not perfect, but better than a kick in the head! (with a steel boot)
 

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Thanx... That's good enough... ok, now to look around for liquid latex... :banana
Ben Nye's means you're looking in the theatrical (stage) makeup department. And it's gonna stink like a fish when you use it.

Zebraten, how did you finish off the top coat so it wouldn't remain sticky? Did you powder it? Or did it eventually dry without stickiness?
 

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Ben Nye's means you're looking in the theatrical (stage) makeup department. And it's gonna stink like a fish when you use it.

Zebraten, how did you finish off the top coat so it wouldn't remain sticky? Did you powder it? Or did it eventually dry without stickiness?
Good question I was wondering that too. I've used this stuff in the theater to make wounds, burns, blend beards etc... Always had to powder between coats, then powder the top coat. Ben Nye makes a translucent powder that doesn't change the color or the latex. In applying this as makeup you can use a hair dryer on low to dry it quicker (still need to powder between coats). No idea if that would help or is even needed in this application, but it might.

This is a really cool effect you have here, I'm very interested in your process.
 

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Woodland Scenics also makes liquid latex. I've used it for many years for making molds etc., as well as similar to what Zebraten has done here. Applied in painted-on thin coats, you can build it up into any thickness you want. Subsequent coats stick seamlessly to previous ones. Once dried/cured it is a smooth and non-sticky finish. No need for powdering.

For old pieces, heat can cause some self-sticking, so a dusting of powder in that case would be prudent. Just like in so many older toys as well.

Good job on the project, Z10. It's coming out very well. Did you create a fabric base sleeve?

If it's any help, to somewhat alleviate the bunching effect, you can build the prosthetic on an arm that is already halfway flexed. Later, when fully flexed, there will be less slack to bunch up and the elbow will just have a bit more stretch. Conversely, when extended, the inside will have a bit of stretch and the elbow will have it's natural look of wrinkling.

Keep us updated. Great results so far. :thumb
 

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Mandoll withdrawl
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This liquid latex stuff looks like a great tip. Do you think it would work well for exposed BBi wrist joints? That is the part that irks me the most. A tutorial would be most appreciated, as it looks really good on your big boned fella. Good job so far, keep us posted :)
 

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AKA "ChiliDoug"
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7,541 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Ben Nye's means you're looking in the theatrical (stage) makeup department. And it's gonna stink like a fish when you use it.

Zebraten, how did you finish off the top coat so it wouldn't remain sticky? Did you powder it? Or did it eventually dry without stickiness?
I feel as though I am walking a path that has already been trodden by some of the more experienced members here! As LG2 said, Once it dries overnight, it really isn't sticky, although it can be a bit sticky if it touches another part of the mold.

Nice! You should give us some tutorials!
I'll work up a tutorial tonight and post it in the tutorial section. I really am just a novice with this stuff though.

Good question I was wondering that too. I've used this stuff in the theater to make wounds, burns, blend beards etc... Always had to powder between coats, then powder the top coat. Ben Nye makes a translucent powder that doesn't change the color or the latex. In applying this as makeup you can use a hair dryer on low to dry it quicker (still need to powder between coats). No idea if that would help or is even needed in this application, but it might.

This is a really cool effect you have here, I'm very interested in your process.
so far, I have not used powder, so I guess I can count myself lucky.

Woodland Scenics also makes liquid latex. I've used it for many years for making molds etc., as well as similar to what Zebraten has done here. Applied in painted-on thin coats, you can build it up into any thickness you want. Subsequent coats stick seamlessly to previous ones. Once dried/cured it is a smooth and non-sticky finish. No need for powdering.

For old pieces, heat can cause some self-sticking, so a dusting of powder in that case would be prudent. Just like in so many older toys as well.

Good job on the project, Z10. It's coming out very well. Did you create a fabric base sleeve?

If it's any help, to somewhat alleviate the bunching effect, you can build the prosthetic on an arm that is already halfway flexed. Later, when fully flexed, there will be less slack to bunch up and the elbow will just have a bit more stretch. Conversely, when extended, the inside will have a bit of stretch and the elbow will have it's natural look of wrinkling.

Keep us updated. Great results so far. :thumb
LG2, you are the man! A fabric sleeve is a great idea. I'll try that next time, especially for legs/knees.

This liquid latex stuff looks like a great tip. Do you think it would work well for exposed BBi wrist joints? That is the part that irks me the most. A tutorial would be most appreciated, as it looks really good on your big boned fella. Good job so far, keep us posted :)
Saiko, Yeah, it could hide the BBI joints, I'm sure. But it would leave a seam, so you'd either have to paint to match the arm/hand, or go all the way up, like I did, until the arm/hand meets cloth.

Thanks guys for the interest. I'll keep at it; I've gotten the other arm done too and it looks fine. So far, so good!
 
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