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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello

iam going to build a Cypher UAV on 1/6 scale for a Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter bash.

and i need a little help.

these are the dimensions

# Length: 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
# Rotor diameter: 4 ft 0 in (1.22 m)
# Height: 2 ft 0 in (0.61 m)
# Disc area: 25.2 ft² (2.4 m²)

what will the demensions be if its one 1/6th figure scale ?

and can someone tell me what the disc area means ?

thanks in advance

 

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hello

iam going to build a Cypher UAV on 1/6 scale for a Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter bash.

and i need a little help.

these are the dimensions

# Length: 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
# Rotor diameter: 4 ft 0 in (1.22 m)
# Height: 2 ft 0 in (0.61 m)
# Disc area: 25.2 ft² (2.4 m²)

what will the demensions be if its one 1/6th figure scale ?
I don't wish to sound facetious but why don't you just divide everything by 6?

1/6 scale - the hint is in the name.

Unless I'm missing something here?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't wish to sound facetious but why don't you just divide everything by 6?

1/6 scale - the hint is in the name.

Unless I'm missing something here?
i thought the same, but wasn't sure about it, dont wanna spend hours work on something that has the wrong size
 

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i thought the same, but wasn't sure about it, dont wanna spend hours work on something that has the wrong size
Fair one - if it were that simple then how come a HT M4 is a different size to a DML M4 for example? Lots of different examples could be given.

But in essence I'd just do the math and see how it looks.
 

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Monkey Gun Man
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I would guess that the disk area would be the cross sectional area of the bottom of the cypher. I did a quick calculation and found with a radius of 3 feet you would get an area of 28.3 ft^2. So it is probabaly the area where the rotator is.
 

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Disc Area

The "disc area" is basically the area of the circle scribed by the tips of the propeller. If I'm not mistaken, there are two propellers counter-rotating inside the fan shroud. The area would then be double of one propeller diameter/area. For helicopters, this is mathmatically described in an equation [(P r²) where P=Pi (3.14159) and r = radius (1/2 diameter) of the propeller]. Also (again if I'm wrong...please correct me) but I've seen the drone several times while playing GRAW:AW and the fan shroud seemed to be alot taller than the pictures above.....? Awwww...skip that, I just found a picture and, other than camo paint it looks identical to the pictures above. Gotta clean those glasses more often I guess.
 

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Folkwulfe's explanation seems to makes sense. The area covered by one of the propellers (at 4" in diameter) would be about 12.57 sq. ft. The second propeller doubles that to 25.14 sq. ft, nearly the same as the disc area from the specs. Won't really affect your measurements for building it though, cuz the disc area probably pertains more to how much lift/downforce the thing can achieve.
 

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There is an excellent (and free) program available.It is called "Scale Calculator".LaughingGravy told me about it a long time ago.Google it and there are sites you can download it from.Very useful.
 

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In response to how tall the tripod is compared to the lower portion, there is a way to figure this out manually if you can get good photos of this thing from a "side-on" view (actually, the one above looks pretty good) and you have the patience to do some math. It's a somewhat slow, meticulous process, but I did it quite successfully for a mechanical drafting project where I built a 1:20 scale Lunar Lander from scratch. It was made entirely out of heavy card stock, and I extrapolated the the layout from a small 3-view orthographic drawing of the thing. (I could even separate the top and lower halves just like the real thing.)

Here's the process I used:
- I carefully measured all the dimensions of the major features using a set of dividers and a fine scale ruler
- Then, using the overall dimensions for height and width from the reference drawing, I calculated the 1:1 dimensions of all the major features
- Finally, I divided by 20 to get the scaled dimension. (In you case you'll use 6)

It worked out really well. You've already got the overall dimiensions, so you're off to a good start. If you can get a good side and top view pic for measurements you're off to the races. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
In response to how tall the tripod is compared to the lower portion, there is a way to figure this out manually if you can get good photos of this thing from a "side-on" view (actually, the one above looks pretty good) and you have the patience to do some math. It's a somewhat slow, meticulous process, but I did it quite successfully for a mechanical drafting project where I built a 1:20 scale Lunar Lander from scratch. It was made entirely out of heavy card stockcard and I extrapolated the the layout from a small 3-view orthographic drawing of the thing. (I could even separate the top and lower halves just like the real thing.)

Here's the process I used:
- I carefully measured all the dimensions of the major features using a set of dividers and a fine scale ruler
- Then, using the overall dimensions for height and width from the reference drawing, I calculated the 1:1 dimensions of all the lajor features
- Finally, I divided by 20 to get the scaled dimension. (In you case you'll use 6)

It worked out really well. You've already got the overall dimiensions, so you're off to a good start. If you can get a good side and top view pic for measurements you're off to the races. Good luck!
thanks dude, this is a really good idea !:clap
 

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Since the disc area has already been explained, I'll add this.

With a rough calculation used by the means 38Oliver mentioned, you should be able to figure out the diameter of the rotor blade(4ft 0in, or 1.22m). Length, or overall diameter (OAD) as it should be called, is 6ft 2in, or 1.88 m. That measurement would be the 4ft rotor diameter + 1in x 2, all around the blades + 12in x 2, all around the blades, or the shroud. That can give you a starting equation.

Next for height, do the same. Looks to me like the height is measured without the tripod on it(2ft 0in or .61m), from the base of the feet, to the top of the rotor shroud. Since the OAD is 6ft 2in, and it is easily 3x larger in diameter than height, you can be safe to say that's without the optical accessories. That is provided those measurements are good too.
 

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BioChem Division
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to convert to sixth scale, you divide the dimension each by 6, hence 1/6

the only thing is the dimentional area, which you would have to divide by 6-squared (36) since its measurement is in feet-squared.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
iam going to make two mock-up versions first. the first one will be made out of paper and the second out of cardboard. here is the first picture of the step by step build with paper

 
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