Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

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Thread: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

  1. #1
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    Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    This is something that I've wondered about for awhile. People are often asking for certain figures of differing nationalities and eras. Modern Canadian and Russian figures are quite frequently requested. Why aren't there more companies in some of those countries creating those figures? Is the 1:6 market really so small that there wouldn't be enough interest for companies in Russia or Canada (among others) to create figures of their own armed forces? I know that there are companies in some countries that have stepped up and filled the gap. Little French Army has started producing French figures and Twisting Toyz created a number of Italian figures. Russia in particular is really puzzling. Russians have a huge amount of pride in their armed forces and their military history. Years ago I built aircraft and armor model kits and I remember some kits would occasionally surface from companies like Novo in the Soviet Union and SMER in Czechoslovakia. Many of those kits were of aircraft and armor from those countries that other companies weren't producing. I just wonder why they did it with scale models (and still do) as far back as the 1960s but they haven't done it in 1:6 scale.

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  3. #2
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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    At this point it's all about demand. There would have to be a lot of people screaming to get them, to have enough made.

    If a modern Canadian figure was made, I'd personally buy 10 of them, and some other Canadians would step up and do the same. Then there are the ones we don't hear about, the lurkers, and ebay folk that don't post opinions, but would still buy them. And out of country like U.S., and Europe, and Asian markets would snap some up. But would it be enough to warrant making the quantity of figures needed to keep the price down on them? Probably not.

    Everybody says they want them, but when it comes to actually buying them, the market is less black and white. And that's a risk many companies just don't want to take.

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    On Russians:

    There's Zvezda doing 1/48 and 1/72, they are a good company for model kits, just like DML, but just because one company is good at making model kits does not means it's good at making 1/6, or at least at the standards currently on the market.

    Take for example the Armoury Russian, that's the last boxed modern Russian I remember, and yet the uniform's tailoring leaves much to be desired, same thing with DML, their model kits are OK, but they really can't get their picattiny rials right, ever, but take the recent AK/M16 combo kit and I can say it's probably one of the best AK's for the price, and the M16s are great too, but the last figure I bought was Ilya I think, with the PTRD, the uniform was bad to OK, and the sculpt left much to be desired, yet the PPS-43 and PTRD are quite cool.

    All that is because tailoring and painting are skilled labor, and require time and skills not readily available in many countries.

    For example, If i was to found a company and start to produce 1/6 Mexicans, the tailoring skills would be there, the manufacturing skills would be there, but the painting skills for the sculpt, and the sculptors themselves would take the most time to come up to par with what's out there (and besides, who else wants 1/6 Mexicans?, I'm not even sure there is a market here because of purchase power) irregardless:

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    you may lead yourself astray.
    I used to be a collector, then I took a paycut to the knee.

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  6. #4
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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    I would guess that not too many citizens of Australia - for example - despite their enormous respect for their armed forces, would be prepared to spend 14 hours a day stitching teeny tiny slouch hats together for a buck an hour.

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lejuan View Post
    I would guess that not too many citizens of Australia - for example - despite their enormous respect for their armed forces, would be prepared to spend 14 hours a day stitching teeny tiny slouch hats together for a buck an hour.
    No, but it would be possible to ä'rent' a company in say Hong Kong or China to do it for you.

    The problem lies probably more in the fact that that kind of figures don't SELL. Give the average collectero/customer a superhero, a US SF trooper or WW2 German any day of the week - that is the kind of stuff that sells, not a Dutch modern tanker or even modern Canadian infantryman.

    Apart from that making all the stuff is expensive, to that comes the research which must (as we have seen wtih DiD's WW1 line) be done well, or it will be slammed hard on the forums. And that costs money and not a cent less.

    We are now seeing most run off the mill figures clocking in at least at $50 for a very cheap Dragon, and more likely over $100 for a high quality Hot Toys figure, but I would estimate that the actual cost of a figure (in western terms) is around the double, at least. This is off set by the cheap production by underpaid factory workers - but to get a western company to do this, at that cost would be almost finacial suicide - especially since no one would know exactly how well one of these obscure figures would sell.

    I would love some diversion from film figures, super heroes and the like and get my hands on an early 18th century Swedish infantryman - but that's not gonna happen.

    Right, let me get off my soap box...

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    fullmetal's Customs:fullmetals
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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Look at what Neil Greystone's done with his Poultney's Regiment and Highlander. Great figures, but expensive. I really hope he succeeds with the venture, but I somehow doubt it.

    I think the same goes for more 'marginal' figures.

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lejuan View Post
    I would guess that not too many citizens of Australia - for example - despite their enormous respect for their armed forces, would be prepared to spend 14 hours a day stitching teeny tiny slouch hats together for a buck an hour.
    I never suggested that production should be in Canada, Australia etc. Hasbro is an American company but they aren't paying Americans a buck an hour to produce toys. They farm the production out to other countries just like many other companies do in America, Australia, Canada etc.

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Supply and demand.
    If it ain't Special Forces, SEAL or Band of Brothers, it's a risky investment.

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    in china there were three domestic brands for chinese soldiers (Legacy (chinese military and police, early DML level quality), red army (communist peoples army solders) by MCToys and the WeiWuZhiShi figures (like Gi Joe - PTE level of quality and detail) all these lines are dead now i think.

    in UK we recently got 1/7 British army figures (i think the line might be dead now, haven't seen much new at all)

    so at least there are a few non USA military figure lines in the past, they just don't seem to get enough support in their markets

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by jaztermareal View Post
    so at least there are a few non USA military figure lines in the past, they just don't seem to get enough support in their markets
    The same can be said of the general US market. In the heyday of 2000-03 you could find all types of low-priced military figures at TRU but now its a wasteland.

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    The Risk/Reward. US Spec Ops Forces are proven to sell, other Nations Forces less so. You don't bet on a horse that had a broken leg if you can bet on one with a proven winning streak.
    Should i win the lottery i'll take the risk and make a german, swedish and russian figure :P
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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by Scimitar View Post
    I never suggested that production should be in Canada, Australia etc.
    Well, you did use the term "indigenous" in the title of the post, implying that you meant the manufacture would be done in the country of the particular armed forces. That's how I took it.

    As to the original question, that answer is simply "money".

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve O. View Post
    Well, you did use the term "indigenous" in the title of the post, implying that you meant the manufacture would be done in the country of the particular armed forces. That's how I took it.

    As to the original question, that answer is simply "money".
    Interesting aspect though, would you pay more for a figure of the same quality if you knew the company would produce them in america and the money would go to american workers?

    Or does that get too political?
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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    The countries that do produce these figures at a price we are willing to pay can do so because of labor and material costs.

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    I can say about Russia for sure. 20-50 collectors in whole
    I was always wondering that making a figs of our forces wd be a great way to develope an interest in learning things about our forces and just experiencing the stuff they use in detail. It's not very developed hobby here, it's a pity for me.
    In fact, there are only 2 online shops of 1:6 scale in Moscow area, and in whole Russia I bet. One of them produces custom Makarov pistols, APS and Vintorez kinda serially. So, who knows, they have a chance to be developed if there will be demand. Just there are not many ppl even knowing about 1:6 in our contry. I really hope it's gonna be a spreaded hobby in our area in closest times...

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Depends on what the OEM manufacturers want in terms of MOQ's. 500? 1000? 2000?

    There are two ways around this problem:

    1) Produce gear sets limited to the basics needed, ie BUDs, weapons, helmets, vests. Skip all the unnecessary bits and bobs that drive the price up. Keep pricing relatively low. Don't need nude figures or head sculpts. Better off spending the dollars on licensing for various gear/parts.

    2) Bundle with HK416's, fancy pants 1911's, a heavy weapon or two.

    I'm sure some may say option 1 isn't even viable, but I'd say that going for something different rather than rehashing everything that's already been done 3-4x provides more competitive breathing room. I think the guys that had trouble in this area before and cited low demand suffered from the same old same old syndrome. The whole low demand thing is a self fulfilling prophecy if you are just rehashing the same subjects all over again.

    Unfortunately this will never be a mass merchant sponsored hobby like it used to.

  20. #18
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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve O. View Post
    Well, you did use the term "indigenous" in the title of the post, implying that you meant the manufacture would be done in the country of the particular armed forces. That's how I took it.

    As to the original question, that answer is simply "money".
    What would be a better term to describe companies based in other countries? I don't think the word "domestic" fits any better than "indigenous". I didn't use the word "foreign" because anything outside of any particular persons country would be considered foreign. Since this forum has members of many different nationalities I was trying to avoid terms that would be considered too American. Perhaps I wasn't being specific enough. I'm not trying to be snide but consider the original question to be something along the lines of "Why don't ***** (Russian, German, Swiss etc.) companies produce (as in design and market) figures based on their countries armed forces?".

    As for the assertion that figures other than modern US and WWII Germans don't sell I think that has more to do with the current economy and the unwillingness of most companies to try anything unproven. Also there are companies that are taking chances as far as Non-US modern forces are concerned. There has recently been an Italian SF figure produced and a modern German uniform set. Then you have the French figures that Little French Army are producing (but not manufacturing ) as well as the occasional non-US figure from a few other companies. I have no idea what the sales figures were for those figures and accesory sets but it would be interesting if someone affiliated with one of those companies would reply with a little info. Some info from retailers on how well those figures sold would be welcome also.

    In the past there have been Non-US modern figures that didn't sell well but a lot of that had to do with quality. Obviously some of Armoury's figures didn't sell well considering how easy it still is to find the Russian paratrooper. I have no evidence one way or the other but I believe that some of those figures didn't sell well because of poor design choices and poorly produced products. While Armoury's Russian paratrooper can be made to look nice with some work it's not a very appealing figure right out of the box. It included some interesting and well made items but came up short in other areas. The skin tight pants and the lack of a helmet really hurt the figures overall appeal. BBI also produced a modern Russian (Falcon) that apparently didn't sell very well at the time it was produced. It was a well made figure but could have been much more appealing and versatile with a few design changes.

    Pricing is another thing that is killing the chances of anything modern besides US Special Forces figures and the occasional British figure. This is a hobby that is well on it's way to pricing its way out of existence. Other than the occasional figure that I absolutely must have I won't pay $120+ for figures. What boxed figures I do buy are the occasional older BBI or Dragon figures. However the exhorbitant prices of most figures these days doesn't have to mean that companies can't produce lower priced figures. There is still plenty of room in this hobby (and I believe a need for) low and mid priced figures with respectable levels of detail. I'm not trying to start any arguements here. The topic is just something I've been wondering about. There are a few companies taking chances. I just wish there were more. Also I didn't originally mention but should have that the figures I'm talking about wouldn't necessarily be marketed for export. As jaztermareal mentioned the recent 1/7 scale UK Armed Forces figures were produced for a domestic market. He also mentioned a number of figures produced in China for their domestic market. I'm familiar with those figures and I wish that they were easier to get ahold of. There is also a guy in Canada that is producing very basic 1:18 scale modern Canadian figures for the domestic market. With the demise of 21C the 1:18 military market is nearly dead (except for PTE) but this guy is producing them anyway.

    Also just because something is produced for a domestic market doesn't mean that it shouldn't be available outside of that market. With eBay and international retailers we should be able to get figures produced for just about any market.

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by Scimitar View Post
    What would be a better term to describe companies based in other countries? I don't think the word "domestic" fits any better than "indigenous". I didn't use the word "foreign" because anything outside of any particular persons country would be considered foreign. Since this forum has members of many different nationalities I was trying to avoid terms that would be considered too American. Perhaps I wasn't being specific enough. I'm not trying to be snide but consider the original question to be something along the lines of "Why don't ***** (Russian, German, Swiss etc.) companies produce (as in design and market) figures based on their countries armed forces?".

    As for the assertion that figures other than modern US and WWII Germans don't sell I think that has more to do with the current economy and the unwillingness of most companies to try anything unproven. Also there are companies that are taking chances as far as Non-US modern forces are concerned. There has recently been an Italian SF figure produced and a modern German uniform set. Then you have the French figures that Little French Army are producing (but not manufacturing ) as well as the occasional non-US figure from a few other companies. I have no idea what the sales figures were for those figures and accesory sets but it would be interesting if someone affiliated with one of those companies would reply with a little info. Some info from retailers on how well those figures sold would be welcome also.

    In the past there have been Non-US modern figures that didn't sell well but a lot of that had to do with quality. Obviously some of Armoury's figures didn't sell well considering how easy it still is to find the Russian paratrooper. I have no evidence one way or the other but I believe that some of those figures didn't sell well because of poor design choices and poorly produced products. While Armoury's Russian paratrooper can be made to look nice with some work it's not a very appealing figure right out of the box. It included some interesting and well made items but came up short in other areas. The skin tight pants and the lack of a helmet really hurt the figures overall appeal. BBI also produced a modern Russian (Falcon) that apparently didn't sell very well at the time it was produced. It was a well made figure but could have been much more appealing and versatile with a few design changes.

    Pricing is another thing that is killing the chances of anything modern besides US Special Forces figures and the occasional British figure. This is a hobby that is well on it's way to pricing its way out of existence. Other than the occasional figure that I absolutely must have I won't pay $120+ for figures. What boxed figures I do buy are the occasional older BBI or Dragon figures. However the exhorbitant prices of most figures these days doesn't have to mean that companies can't produce lower priced figures. There is still plenty of room in this hobby (and I believe a need for) low and mid priced figures with respectable levels of detail. I'm not trying to start any arguements here. The topic is just something I've been wondering about. There are a few companies taking chances. I just wish there were more. Also I didn't originally mention but should have that the figures I'm talking about wouldn't necessarily be marketed for export. As jaztermareal mentioned the recent 1/7 scale UK Armed Forces figures were produced for a domestic market. He also mentioned a number of figures produced in China for their domestic market. I'm familiar with those figures and I wish that they were easier to get ahold of. There is also a guy in Canada that is producing very basic 1:18 scale modern Canadian figures for the domestic market. With the demise of 21C the 1:18 military market is nearly dead (except for PTE) but this guy is producing them anyway.

    Also just because something is produced for a domestic market doesn't mean that it shouldn't be available outside of that market. With eBay and international retailers we should be able to get figures produced for just about any market.
    Well said.

    Regarding the markets, I'd say we are no longer (or shouldn't) be limited to our domestic vendors thanks to internet and all stores around here (I have still not found anything remotely related to 1/6 in a normal walk-in store). Therefore, I see distribution as less of a problem than the actual production.

    Companies tend to lean on what is a sure sell - in our 1/6 world, that means US special forces, German WW2, superheroes and movie figures, and that's really about it. If a company wants to make a buck this is where they will spend their energy and resources, because it is sure to sell and give a revenue in the end.

    Sure, we might complain and yell about wanting this and that and his brother - but it won't happen if a figure won't fit in amongst the four big ones. Occasionally, a company might throw us a bone and release something different, but then its back to the usual stuff, because the new innovative things won't sell (I should have that part on the clipboard by now).

    Also to be noted, the biggest markets can be found in Asia and the US, and they pretty much set the rules for what sells. A European might think a French infantryman of the Franco-German war of 1871 would be neat, but how well would that sell in those markets? Better churn out a superhero and make some money baby.

    I'm not pointing fingers here; I just try to explain how it works. Money talks as AC/DC said. It has never been said better.

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    I'm surprised some enterprising company hasn't tried the croudsourcing/kickstarter route. That is: Rather than take the risk by producing a figure that might not sell, get numbers to commit to a minimum order quanity, if the MOQ isn't met the figure doesn't go into production. If a manufacturer has already produced figures they should know the development/production costs. We already pre-order figures so it would just be a slightly longer lead time...

  23. #21
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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by DJMc View Post
    I'm surprised some enterprising company hasn't tried the croudsourcing/kickstarter route. That is: Rather than take the risk by producing a figure that might not sell, get numbers to commit to a minimum order quanity, if the MOQ isn't met the figure doesn't go into production. If a manufacturer has already produced figures they should know the development/production costs. We already pre-order figures so it would just be a slightly longer lead time...
    That works in theory but how many people would pay up front to a company they've never done business with before (because it's a start-up) for a product that has yet to be made? I know I'd adopt a wait and see approach.

    I'm going to assume the original question is actually: why are there no domestic 1/6 companies in Canada, Russia, Australia etc. producing their country's military figures?

    I think your answer is inadequate consumer base. The 1/6 hobby has a tiny market share, not enough to sustain sales in a smaller country. Example. I live in a city of 2.5 million with a surrounding suburban area bringing the population up to double that. So a potential market of 5 million, which supports about 15 hobby shops, 2 of which are exclusively model trains, the rest general purpose hobbies. None of them even sell 1/6. Not a one.

    What does the population have to be, to support a domestic 1/6 manufacturer? And why is Russia, with it's population of 142 million, without a domestic producer? Perhaps discretionary income is not there.

    In any case, the reason boils down to money.

    I love my country and I'm very proud of our military and its achievements but if I wanted to start a successful company in here, it wouldn't be making 1/6 figures for the local market. Conversely if I wanted to start a successful 1/6 company, it wouldn't be here. It would be where the population is the largest, the dicretionary income highest, and I'd make whatever I thought would sell best.

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    I think the reason that "get numbers to commit to a minimum order quanity" will not work has already been stated here.......people will jump on the band wagon and say "yeah, I'll take 6", then when the figure comes out and it's time to open the wallets, and the figure is not quite what they thought it would be, they buy zero, and the manufacturer is stuck with it.

    No company wants stuff in a warehouse anymore; gone are the days when things were "always in stock"....if it don't/won't sell, it don't/won't get made.
    “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing"

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by onesixthpolice View Post
    I think the reason that "get numbers to commit to a minimum order quanity" will not work has already been stated here.......people will jump on the band wagon and say "yeah, I'll take 6", then when the figure comes out and it's time to open the wallets, and the figure is not quite what they thought it would be, they buy zero, and the manufacturer is stuck with it.

    No company wants stuff in a warehouse anymore; gone are the days when things were "always in stock"....if it don't/won't sell, it don't/won't get made.
    Sad, but very true.
    I'm not hatin' but whatever avid collector's enthusiasm to spend money on a new pre-order figure would often disappear once they see the new Hot Toys release. Guess which one they go for instead...

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by SPEARHEAD View Post
    Sad, but very true.
    I'm not hatin' but whatever avid collector's enthusiasm to spend money on a new pre-order figure would often disappear once they see the new Hot Toys release. Guess which one they go for instead...
    True, and it doesn't help that all these companies are constantly bringing out the same figures as the other guy.....why?
    “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing"

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Okay. The general concensus seems to be that in most deveoped countries outside of the US and parts of Asia that the consumer base just isn't there for the types of 1/6 figures being discussed. For high end 1/6 figures I absolutely agree. However there is a consumer base that is being overlooked and that is children. As has been previously mentioned in China there have been 1/6 figures produced for the domestic market. For the most part those figures were not high end at all. Many like those by M&C Toys were marketed as toys. This hobby evolved from toys marketed for children to what it is today. I believe that for this hobby to survive some companies are going to have to go back to developing 1/6 toys to bring more children into it.

    I know I'm getting a bit off topic but my point is that I would be more than happy to see a toy line that consisted of reasonably accurate 1/6 international figures no matter what company in whatever country created them. If a company made those figures and kept the cost at toy levels then the market should be there. When you consider the 1/6 figures that M&C Toys can produce in their Power Team Elite line every year to stock the shelves at Big Lots stores for about $10 a figure you have to wonder if that could be done elsewhere with more international themed figures. BTW I buy a fair number of PTE figures. They might be marketed as toys but they have lots of items in them that stand up quite well alongside higher end items from other companies. If they had more international uniforms with those figures I would buy more.

    Perhaps it would take some kind of international partership between a domestic company in Canada/Russia/Sweden etc and a company like M&C but I don't see any reason that they couldn't bring figures to market at toy prices.
    Last edited by Scimitar; 05-28-2012 at 21:32.

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by DJMc View Post
    I'm surprised some enterprising company hasn't tried the croudsourcing/kickstarter route. That is: Rather than take the risk by producing a figure that might not sell, get numbers to commit to a minimum order quanity, if the MOQ isn't met the figure doesn't go into production. If a manufacturer has already produced figures they should know the development/production costs. We already pre-order figures so it would just be a slightly longer lead time...
    Now there's an idea.

    I was too late to a kickstarter project for a web comic called Order of the Stick (wonderful comic, really recommended) with the purpose of bringing old books back to print.

    With a kickstarter project, you could both affect the figure in question as it was being developed (good for customer) as well as ensure it would be sold (since each contribution could be set as a down-payment for the figure). Sure, it would probably take some time before the figure could be shipped, but then you would have a figure that you would exactly know how it would look when it would arrive.

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    I think the video game industry plays its part to a certain extent. The vast majority of military FPS titles feature US special forces. COD, the Ghost Recon stuff, it's what sells. If they did a game for the consoles that featured armed forces from more countries then there might be a bigger market for them.

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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    In general 1/6 figures do not sell like they once did, that is why most of them are sold online, the early part of the 2000's you could find a variety of 1/6 figures at places like Toys R us, most of them was military, now you will be lucky if you can find a 1/6 G.I. Joe....when places like Toys R us sold Blue box, 21century and other 1/6 figures, you could buy them from 14-29 dollars, now it's more like a 100-150 online.....

    If they were mass produced like they once were companies could charge less, since they don't they have to make sure they get a return on their investment which means higher prices, If they sold the figures that we buy at 40 dollars their returns would be so low that they would simply not consider it worth bothering with and there would go 1/6 figures, except maybe the G.I. Joe that I see trying to creep back into Targets, Toys R us, but to be frank after buying Hot Toys, Dam, and other companies the G.I. Joe looks cheap, if they were all I had to choose from I would not buy them.

    Companies are going to go for the sure thing and that seem to be U.S. armed forces, If you hope to see other countries armed forces there have to be a demand for them and frankly this is one of the few post I have seen clamoring for other countries Armed Forces. Everyone who wants figures of other countries armed forces, shoot your favorite company a e-mail, maybe if they get enough people interested they will give it a shot. Then go out and buy the thing....

  31. #29
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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Interesting comments gentlemen. Frankly, having entered the 1:6 world with eyes open, I see great potential in many future historic figures because people like looking back. That's why we have so many history programmes on tv. There are some very interesting anniversary dates coming up from key moments in British, European and world wars, all of them are the focus of anniversary events and commemorations, and rightly so. Men have died for what they believed in for centuries and for as long as there are people willing to recall and honour their sacrifice and their bravery, 1:6 models of them will sell! God help us if we ever lose sight of why we are free.
    Last edited by Neil Greystones; 06-15-2012 at 18:26. Reason: Typos and additional wording.

  32. #30
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    Re: Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by Scimitar View Post
    This is something that I've wondered about for awhile. People are often asking for certain figures of differing nationalities and eras. Modern Canadian and Russian figures are quite frequently requested. Why aren't there more companies in some of those countries creating those figures?
    Well, three years later, we got the modern Russians...

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Why aren't more indigenous companies creating figures of their armed forces?
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