Go Figure. We’re recapturing our youth and having fun

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Thread: Go Figure. We’re recapturing our youth and having fun

  1. #1
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    USMCWayne is offline In the bush..........Nam baby!
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    Go Figure. We’re recapturing our youth and having fun

    An article in today’s paper really hit the nail on the head, in terms of why we do what we do.

    “When Lois Katzke turned 13, the start of her passage from girlhood to womanhood, she discovered one startling fact about this exciting journey: No dolls allowed.

    She did not want to give up her hobby, but family and friends made it clear she was too old for dolls. "I was shamed into giving them up."

    Flash forward 44 years. Each Thursday she is among a dozen women who for three hours paint, assemble and costume their own creations at Sandy's Dream Doll shop in Glendale, Ariz.”

    http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pb...510070327/1023

    The link is only part of the entire story that appeared in my daily newspaper, but the point is clear.

    We collect and “play” with dolls, GI Joes, and toy trains; we own and ride horses; we collect comic books and baseball cards; and we play musical instruments, because it’s fun, because it helps us handle daily stresses, and because we have “the time, the money and the inclination to dip their toes back into childhood, reconnecting with the things that brought them so much joy.”

    My first action figure as a card-carrying adult was a SOTW figure from Target for one of my boys. I was so impressed with the changes that I had to see more and somehow ended up with a Dragon Dave figure.

    That was about five years ago. Since then, my collection, my skills, and my knowledge has grown, as has my willingness to give a .... less what others think about what I do. They have their hobbies and eccentricities, I have mine.

    As a pre-teen, some four decades ago, I still recall the model soldier kit I built. Unpainted, unmoving, and unimpressive, I thought he was the coolest thing in the world.

    Girls, sports, jobs, growing up, and probably the fear of being marked as a teenager who played with dolls all intruded on that simple pleasure.

    I suspect a lot of the same thing happens today, with our younger members and collectors who claim to be burnt out on the hobby. But it’s okay, just know that we, or someone resembling us, will be here when you look to recapture your youth or rekindle the simple pleasure of building GI Joes.
    Wayne
    Malta, MT

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  3. #2
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    I was just recounting to my five year old son how my brothers and I used to play with our (now vintage) GijoEs in my parents yard.

    It's amazing to me how much the feeling resonates.

    My seven year old daughter also likes to play with action figures, and the two of them spend a lot of time playing Star Wars, Lord of the Rings, Barbie, Fashion Polly or whatever. I can also see them doing this with there own children one day too.

    Generations...

    Cool huh.
    Maintiens le Droits

  4. #3
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    I should send that article to my co-workers, they always tease me about "playing with dolls" I dont pay much attention to them anyway, so like Jay-Z says I "brush that dirt of my shoulders". I proudly displays my action figures where I can in my office, I rarely leave them overnight because you know how people like to get into trouble.
    An AK a day keeps the bad guys away.

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  6. #4
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    Awesome story, and how true.

  7. #5
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    Even on the days I don't "assemble" anything, I can still walk past the figures on my bookshelves and in an instant re-connect with a very happy and simpler time in my life...

    I was one of those for whom the term "Vintage Joes" means a military action figure; by the time Adventure Team came around, I was "too old" for toys.
    Even though it wasn't readily available back then, I ALWAYS WANTED Civil War, Napoleonic, WW1 and WW2 figures. Suddenly I was "too old" for GIJ(but in retrospect, I was still just a kid!!)

    Forty years, three college degrees, two careers, one marriage and two kids later, SOTW came to the rescue with their WW1, Civil War and Revolutionary War figures (to me SOTW has ALWAYS had a certian simplistic nostlgia factor to them). Then GIJ, then Ultimate Soldier, BBi, DML, etc.

    Now I've got a collection I'm happy with. Gaining the wisdom that "you're never too old to play" and the need for a disconnect from the stresses of the work day has been some of the more valuable lessons learned... pretty easy to do!!

  8. #6
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    That is great. It was just the opposite for me though. When I turned 14 I started selling off my 3 inch joes and my baseball cards because I felt too old for them. My Dad pulled me aside and told me about some of the great stuff he had as a kid and how he regretted he did not still have it. He then bought me the 12 inch RAH figs for Christmas and said you don't have to play with them just put them on your shelf or something. I kept what I had and when the classic joes with muscle type bodies started coming out I was all over them. I loved the 12 inch compared to the 3 inch. You could just do more with them and I never really had them as a kid. Everybody that has ever seen my collection always thinks it's cool, sometimes wierd but cool. I think it brings nostalgia to them. Sorry for rambling. I love my figures and my hobby, not only do they resemble my job as a Marine, but they are also historical...but most of all they are just FUN.
    We Do Bad Things To Bad People.

  9. #7
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    I had a lot of toys as a kid, but Joe is the one that occupies my time as an adult. Still have a number of toys from many years ago, and I enjoy them as the spirit moves me, but Joe and his 1/6th allies are what I keep going back to, time after time.
    "I live in my own little world. But it's OK. They know me here."

    "No healthy person willingly heaps abuse upon another struggling soul."

  10. #8
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    Thumbs up

    I had a professor in graduate school (one of those social historians) who always used to remark: "let's face it, no one ever had a happy childhood." He was well-meaning. He meant that in the broad sense of the trials and tribulations almost everyone faces growing up (who didn't get a Lamborghini for their 16th, and go to Prep' Skewel and Harvard, that is! ).

    So, why should we "mere mortals" NOT connect back to those favorite films, books, OR toys, that gave us a little respite from the "grind" that was "the system," and our peers and/or our family giving us grief just because they knew how???

    PLAY ON, I say!!!!!


  11. #9
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    My focus is trying to make my figures look as real and put a little history behind them. I catch a lot of junk for my figures when I talk to friends about my hobby. Then someone will come over to the house and what to look around. They get into my Joe room and a hour later they are still there asking if they can bring a friend to have a look. That is when I know they are no loger dolls!

  12. #10
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    Great story. I know it was tough for me to give up my toys when I was young but I think the stigma of being a "kid" is worse today than when I was a kid.

    My 8-year-old is harassed by fellow 2nd graders for wearing Star Wars t-shirts and talking about Transformers.

    He handles it well and takes it in stride but it was hard for us to believe the grief he was getting for openly liking Spiderman or Yoda.

  13. #11
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    A nice story and a good read from you guys.

    I never stopped. Got lots of pressure from my friends and parents to "grow up" and "quit playing with toys". I say NUTS to that. I'm 40 years old and I love toys. Used to use allowance now I used a paycheck.

    Longhorn - sorry for your little guy. It's tough enough when society puts pressure on you to grow up and be an adult (and your not ready and have to be dragged kicking and screaming...).
    got privilege?

  14. #12
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    I'd rather have a kid who enjoyed being just that, and developed into a balanced human, than these mini-adults who grow up to be the empty people we've all encountered.
    You are
    What you do
    When it counts---The Masao
    - Ryan Bonaminio lived his life this way -

  15. #13
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    I loved my Joes as a kid.One of many who wish they never got rid of them.Paid a lot of money for a vintage Green Beret figure several years ago because it was my favorite as a kid.Just looking at it brings a smile to my face remembering playing with my big brother and our friends.Was worth every penny.
    Also loved building models as a kid.This hobby lets me combine both.I have to admit I get a big kick when someone asks "You made that?".

  16. #14
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    well i'm only 20, and i recently 'rediscovered' the hobby from when i was younger. i found this site the day i broke up with my girlfriend and let me tell you, there is not better therapy than kitbashing and looking at everyone else's work...thanks for the article
    Never get off the boat

  17. #15
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    I'm pretty glad that I was never pressured or shamed into giving up anything just because I was deemed too old for that hobby in question. Thanks for the article, Wayne!

    Quote Originally Posted by pukingdog View Post
    I'd rather have a kid who enjoyed being just that, and developed into a balanced human, than these mini-adults who grow up to be the empty people we've all encountered.
    I cannot say this better than PD.
    History repeats itself, first as tragedy, then as farce. - Karl Marx

  18. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Longhorn92 View Post
    My 8-year-old is harassed by fellow 2nd graders for wearing Star Wars t-shirts and talking about Transformers.
    You tell your boy to never give up what he likes unless he wants to. Those people who criticise him don't care about him as an individual, nor do they even know who they are yet. They're suckers to a shallow society and will never be truly happy in this world if their values depend on the opinions of others. I've been both people, the geek and the cool guy, and I've always been happier as the geek, even when I was the cool guy around my friends and felt like I needed to keep the geek to myself for when I went home.

    I never stopped collecting figures and building models. I've collected Star Wars and Joes since day one. I've just replaced it all with bigger and better toys as I got older and toys are now made for adult collectors. The industry is now justifying what we have all known. For my high school graduation I told my family to get me all the Horizon RoboCop & Terminator and Halcyon Aliens model kits. I felt a little pathetic at the time that I prefered to be in my room with my stuff than out drinking at somebody's house on my graduation day, but when I look back, I wouldn't have enjoyed that day or my life as much if I had let peer pressure decide my pleasures for me. And I'm not a wife-beating alcholic now, so bonus. Fortunately I have always been athletic and physically intimidating, so nobody really looked at me like a true geek, but I was still a geek through and through like many of our proud soldiers here on OSW.

    Now I get to put both hobbies together. Check out what I'm doing with my passion now.
    https://www.onesixthwarriors.com/foru...ad.php?t=81158
    https://www.onesixthwarriors.com/foru...ad.php?t=80330

    This is imagination and this is art. Blockbuster movies would never be made without minds like ours.

  19. #17
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    Anyone copy the article? I got there too late and it isn't linked anymore..

  20. #18
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    I'm lucky. My mom did not get the chance to have a collection so she encourage me to collect. Her brothers don't like it that I'm 20 and still collecting.They rather me grow up and be peckerheads like them, but I say. "Live the life you have and collect every thing that don't collect you."

  21. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Longhorn92 View Post
    Great story. I know it was tough for me to give up my toys when I was young but I think the stigma of being a "kid" is worse today than when I was a kid.

    My 8-year-old is harassed by fellow 2nd graders for wearing Star Wars t-shirts and talking about Transformers.

    He handles it well and takes it in stride but it was hard for us to believe the grief he was getting for openly liking Spiderman or Yoda.
    I know what you mean, Joe. I have a 10-year-old that is a super sweet kid and he constantly struggles with a coupla' knuckleheads at school. My wife and I have always encouraged him to be himself and find his path and we support him whatever that is. I think too many parents force their children to do things they want them to do instead of letting kids engage in recreational activities that make them happy and are in their comfort zone.

    For example, it makes no sense to force a non-athletic child to participate in sports when it will basically kill his/her self confidence when they can't perform up to their teammates and parents expectations.

    Try hard in school, treat others with respect and be happy... that is all we ask of ours.

  22. #20
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    Great stuff. Would love to read the rest of the article. Our younger members should really read stuff like this.

    As much as I like "manly" pursuits, like cars, fishing, sports, etc.... I still like to do things that make me feel like a kid again. When some of my friends talk about their "toys", I just have a chuckle and tell them about my toys. And mine actually are toys. Do what makes you feel good, without guilt or shame. If you have that guilt or shame, you're not doing somthing you enjoy.

    If it's something you are interested in, and important to you, those close to you will support you. And those who ridicule most likely have skeletons and things hidden of their own.

    Embrace your youth always, and enjoy.

  23. #21
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    why the heck do people do that to kids.since when is 'growing up' about leaving behind joy and imagination? nuts to that. live with joy.always have room for imagination. age aint nothin but a number.live...play...love...learn...and enjoy life.too many people cant. you owe it to those who wish they could. now if you'll excuse me...back to my mortgage.

  24. #22
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    We grow up?

  25. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardcase01 View Post
    We grow up?

    Ahhhhcrap, did I miss ANOTHER memo? When was this supposed to happen?

  26. #24
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    Wow , great story . I got really hooked on 12" figs back in the early 90's when GI Joe was re-launched . It was my way of reconnecting with my youth , always had lots of fun playing with my buddy Matt's Adventure Team figs , but was never able to have any of my own because in the late 70's-early 80's $$$ was really tight for Mom .

    I feel it was those lean times that helped to spur my creativity , for as time got better began to get into model building & was able to channel those skills to 1/6 . Some people may think what we do as a Hobby in thier eyes is childish , but I say it keeps me sane ( at times ) , sober & my mind sharp ... by always flexing the brain to come up with new ideas & problem solve.

    This is why I love this hobby so much , plus I have had the greatest priveledge of meeting & becoming friends with some of the most awesome people because of 1/6
    Last edited by widescene; 06-05-2008 at 11:49. Reason: typo's
    " I'm not a miracle worker ... just workin hoping for a miracle "
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  27. #25
    Great section of the article, would have liked to read the rest of it.

    Toys are great and now that i have cash and we are in a 1/6 golden age i can buy them unlike whe i was a kid.

  28. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brave Rifles View Post
    Ahhhhcrap, did I miss ANOTHER memo? When was this supposed to happen?
    Nobody ever really grows up they just hide the little person inside.
    I'll never give up this hobby.

  29. #27
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    I remember when the origal G.I. Joe's came out in the 60's. Vietnam was going strong,(I caught the tail end of it) and the mood of the country was "peace,love, not war" So went the interest of the toy manufacturers in making : G.I. Joe's, Golden Guns (Marx Toys) Johnny Reb Civil war Cannon, B-52 turret gunner, battery powered tanks, Thompson machine guns, Mattel western rifles( they fired plastic bullets) ect. ect. For the last four years I display my collection of 100 plus figures and vechicles at a Regional Library, invite all the local Vet's groups to bring their grandkids, and kids to see what the men looked like who fought for and died for their freedom.Now they are not "toy dolls" but history in miniture. No one laughs, and they just look at them in awe.

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